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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Oct 31 at 16:52

Quantitative Developer


Oct
28
comment How to use enums as flags in C++?
This is a very nice solution, just be careful that it will merrily provide bitwise operations for any type. I am using something similar, but with the addition of traits identifying the types to which I want it to apply combined with a little enable_if magic.
Sep
28
accepted Double comparison (again)
Sep
26
answered Double comparison (again)
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
Setting n=15 doesn't do the job since we are at the edge of double precision. For example, 0.138034776379449 and 0.13803477637944886 are reported as being different at 15 sig. figs. I have tried reading the linked document, but will give it another go, thanks.
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
Don't think that works for the example I gave. If you multiply A and Y by 1e15 and take the integer part, they are equal.
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
My requirement is to identify whether the outputs of the two algorithms are equal to double precision. I suspect this might actually mean "Do the two numbers match in the first 15 significant figures?", but I'm hoping someone can explain.
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
I think you are recommending varying epsilon depending on the size of the numbers I'm comparing. How should I determine the correct epsilon? For example, I might be comparing numbers approximately equal to 1, in which case 1e-19 would be inappropriate. Or the numbers might be of the order 1e-250.
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
Absolute comparison doesn't work. In my example, std::abs(X-A)=8.1e-20, std::abs(Y-A)=1.8e-17, both of which are smaller than std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon().
Sep
25
awarded  Commentator
Sep
25
comment Double comparison (again)
@πάντα ῥεῖ, I don't think that is related. However, the question I linked to does allow me to tell if the numbers are equal to n significant digits, so I can set n=15 - maybe this is the best that can be done? I suppose part of the question is: What does it mean to be accurate to double precision?
Sep
25
revised Double comparison (again)
Correcting X to actually be equal to 15 s.f.
Sep
25
asked Double comparison (again)
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
29
comment Static linking vs dynamic linking
@user2284570 : Afraid I don't understand your comment, but let me try to clarify mine. Assume I have a library built both as a DLL and as a static library. Consider the application that calls a library function. If I link statically, the code for library functions that the application does not use can be ignored by the linker, i.e. the memory usage includes only code that the application actually uses. If I link dynamically, the entire DLL is loaded into memory, so the memory usage may well be greater (delay loading can change when/if the library is loaded).
Jul
8
comment Static linking vs dynamic linking
An advantage of static linking is it permits the linker to strip out code that is not used, so the memory usage of the application can be reduced. You have to worry about C runtime versions though.
Jun
19
awarded  Excavator
Jun
19
revised friend class/function in c++
Fixed the Bjarne link.
Jun
19
suggested approved edit on friend class/function in c++
Jun
18
answered Excel VBA: Generating a new array from an existing array, but skipping specific strings
Jun
17
comment Is it possible to test “internal” class from a c++ dll using MSTest?
A variant of the second option avoids re-compiling all the source files. In the Linker options, add the source project's $(IntDir) to the Additional Library Directories and add the .obj files to the Additional Dependencies. Don't forget the project dependency from the test project to the source project. Of course, maintenance complexity is increased, but only to the usual extent when adding unit tests (i.e. I need to think about what object to pull in to satisfy the test).