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Coder, wanderer, artist, seeker.


May
1
revised Templating a Simple Boost Proto C++ Expression Evaluator
added 205 characters in body
May
1
answered Templating a Simple Boost Proto C++ Expression Evaluator
Apr
26
comment Non-intrusively replacing a custom type with an expression tree
Building up an entire program as a gigantic expression template and evaluating it lazily is impractical, so you'll need to set your sights lower, or else give up on expression templates. With ETs, you must constrain yourself to what you can do in one expression ... basically, between semis. That can be a lot. Some EDSL's use the comma op in place of semis. That way, you can have assign ops that are lazy: a=f(x),b=g(x),c=a*b;. This gets difficult to manage. Another option: make your terminals nullary func objs that type-erase their (lazily computed) values. That costs an allocation, tho.
Apr
26
comment Non-intrusively replacing a custom type with an expression tree
Not sure what you mean by "stores it lazily". When do you want it to be evaluated?
Apr
26
comment C++ BOOST ForEach vs custom defined Macro
You seem to be implying that BOOST_FOREACH only works on compilers that support auto. That's not true. BOOST_FOREACH doesn't use any C++11 features, and in fact works on positively ancient compilers. BOOST_FOREACH is 100% compliant C++03, which is another difference between it an the OP's iterate macro.
Apr
26
answered Ambiguity when using boost::assign::list_of to construct a std::vector
Apr
26
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
26
answered Non-intrusively replacing a custom type with an expression tree
Mar
28
comment Can I stringify a Boost Phoenix expression?
I don't understand the question. _1<_2 defines a function that takes two args and returns a bool. Your foo defines a function that takes two args and returns either x or y. What's the relation between the two?
Mar
18
comment Why use variadic arguments now when initializer lists are avaiable?
Another important difference between variadic templates and C-style varargs is that a C-style vararg function can be separately compiled. A variadic template cannot.
Mar
8
comment Transforming Function Bodies within Boost Phoenix Expressions
I /think/ you'll find that in more complicated contexts that you'll need to create a new scope for your function bodies; hence the let. At least, I seem to recall learning this lesson the hard way, but for the life of me, I can no longer remember why. :-P
Mar
7
comment Emacs - override indentation
Very nice, thanks.
Mar
7
revised Transforming Function Bodies within Boost Phoenix Expressions
added 1053 characters in body
Mar
7
answered Transforming Function Bodies within Boost Phoenix Expressions
Mar
5
comment 'boost::Q_FOREACH' has not been declared
Not using the Qt keywords is the correct answer. See svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/6131 for the long, sorry history of my failed attempts to get Qt and Boost.Foreach to play nicely.
Mar
5
answered Displaying a Flattened Phoenix Expression using Boost Fusion
Feb
26
revised Transforming a Boost C++ Phoenix Expression Tree
added 1156 characters in body
Feb
26
answered Transforming a Boost C++ Phoenix Expression Tree
Feb
19
comment Can I tell at compile time whether a specific set of input types to a Boost.Phoenix lambda is valid?
I don't think proto::matches<> helps you here. You want to know whether an expression a + b / (c - d) compiles for variables of some specified types. You can't do this reliably without c++11's decltype and generalized SFINAE for expressions.
Feb
17
comment Can I tell at compile time whether a specific set of input types to a Boost.Phoenix lambda is valid?
I hesitate even to recommend this, as the code is still evolving, but my C++11 rewrite of Proto might be a better starting point: github.com/ericniebler/proto-0x. It's undocumented and in constant flux. Caveat emptor.