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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 61 votes cast
Apr
16
awarded  Teacher
Apr
16
answered C preprocessor include and paths
Feb
13
comment Python check if function exists without try
Oh I didn't realise you could do that. I don't seem to be able to remove the downvote unless you edit your answer. Can you change something minor so I can remove it?
Feb
12
comment Python check if function exists without try
They specifically said without running the function and gave try as an example of what they don't want to do.
Nov
28
awarded  Informed
Nov
27
comment How to convert a number to string and vice versa in C++
Bruce Dawson has some good articles on what precision is needed for round tripping floating point numbers on his blog.
Nov
27
comment How to convert a number to string and vice versa in C++
The C++ standard says "Returns: Each function returns a string object holding the character representation of the value of its argument that would be generated by calling sprintf(buf, fmt, val) with a format specifier of "%d", "%u", "%ld", "%lu", "%lld", "%llu", "%f", "%f", or "%Lf", respectively, where buf designates an internal character buffer of sufficient size." I had a look at the C99 standard for printf and I think that the number of decimal places is dependent on #define DECIMAL_DIG in float.h.
Nov
26
awarded  Critic
Nov
26
comment How to convert a number to string and vice versa in C++
std::to_string loses a lot precision for floating point types. For instance double f = 23.4323897462387526; std::string f_str = std::to_string(f); returns a string of 23.432390. This makes it impossible to round trip floating point values using these functions.
Sep
2
comment boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
I searched for an open ticket with this problem but couldn't find anything so I've reported the issue with the example code attached. svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/10443
Sep
2
comment boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
I found this commit that references the BOOST_RESULT_OF_USE_TR1_WITH_DECLTYPE_FALLBACK define but you still have to manually define it. I'm not sure if this means that it is a known bug or not though. Where should I report this?
Sep
2
accepted boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
Sep
2
comment boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
@cv_and_he Thanks. Your output argument solution works but unfortunately this was just a stripped down example of the problem. In the real world version we can't have a fusion vector with references as there are no values to initialise them with.
Sep
2
revised boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
correct boost version number
Sep
2
asked boost::fusion::invoke compiler error with Visual Studio 2013
Aug
21
comment Should std::function assignment ignore return type?
Ah sorry I thought that was a copy and paste section you missed, my bad. That works, awesome thanks.
Aug
20
accepted Is it safe to change a function pointers signature and call it to ignore the return type?
Aug
20
comment Is it safe to change a function pointers signature and call it to ignore the return type?
@HWalters That's definitely the most robust option. The definition of the wrapper is more involved than the definition of IgnoreResult above. We are also currently stuck using a compiler without variadic template support so will have to provide many overloads for differeing number of argument types. I thought I'd canvas some opinions before we decide which solution to use.
Aug
20
comment Is it safe to change a function pointers signature and call it to ignore the return type?
@CiaPan That situation doesn't happen in our code, I can see how that would be a problem if this were used in that way though.
Aug
20
comment Is it safe to change a function pointers signature and call it to ignore the return type?
@quantdev I guess my question is more like under what situations would this currently break with gcc, clang and Microsoft compilers. I know it's not safe to rely on undefined behaviour but this seems like the simplest solution for our current solution.