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I write code.


Aug
9
answered HTML Table to CSS
Aug
9
revised HTML Table to CSS
Include screenshot.
Aug
9
revised HTML Table to CSS
Indent; remove extraneous parts; include missing bits from comment.
Aug
9
comment Why is Python's lxml.etree.SubElement a class method not an instance method?
If I saw something like root.addChild("child") I’d think it was appending a text node with the content child.
Aug
9
comment Why am I getting this error when trying to print a matrix in c?
Or use C99 compound literals in conjunction with memcpy.
Aug
9
answered Compact way to map strings to datatype using Parsec
Aug
9
comment In Vim how do I effectively insert the same characters across multiple lines?
@Ven: Well, the <Esc>j experiment works on my machine. As for the use of the GUI version, no, I don’t think it defeats the purpose of using Vim. I find Vim useful in part because it is quick to make changes, particularly repetitive ones, and navigate. Vim is also useful because it can be used within a terminal, but that is not my primary purpose for using it. Using the GUI gives me other advantages, like being able to use more colors (my terminal emulator is crippled and supports only 16 colors).
Aug
9
comment Haskell--Manipulating data within a tuple
@Dev: You could convert before and after the operation, I suppose, but depending on how involved the operation is, the overhead of the conversion might make it less clear than dealing with the tuples directly.
Aug
8
revised How to create a pricetag shape in CSS and HTML
Update with escapes as requested.
Aug
8
revised jQuery .promise syntax error
Reformat using JS Beautifier. Hopefully will not have removed any of the syntax errors.
Aug
8
comment Rapid Class Declaration
For such a simple expression, you might consider using map rather than a list comprehension. It’s a little more concise.
Aug
8
comment How to create a pricetag shape in CSS and HTML
@Roko: Perhaps the last suggestion: you might want to turn some of the Unicode characters into escapes (e.g. \25CF) so if the browser guesses the text encoding wrong (say, UTF-8 misinterpreted as Latin-1) you won’t end up with some nonsense character like â.
Aug
8
comment How to create a pricetag shape in CSS and HTML
@Roko: I ended up with something that looked decent. Still very mildly annoying that the tag doesn’t have a border on it, but I’m not sure much can be done without adding another element.
Aug
8
comment How to create a pricetag shape in CSS and HTML
@Roko: You might be able to fake it with U+25CF BLACK CIRCLE with color: white; text-shadow: 0 0 1px gray;.
Aug
8
comment How to create a pricetag shape in CSS and HTML
The usage of the degree sign is really clever, but I almost wonder whether U+25CB WHITE CIRCLE would be better.
Aug
8
revised Haskell--Manipulating data within a tuple
Lenses *and* records!
Aug
8
answered Haskell--Manipulating data within a tuple
Aug
8
comment Understanding pre/post assembly code for a function call in x86 IA32 assembly
@SpagGuy: As for how the return address is used, well, that’s not something we’re touching (although we could); the call instruction automatically pushes it as part of its operation, and the ret instruction automatically pops and jumps to it. As long as we use ret to return to the caller, all we have to know about the return address is that it’s there and we’ll have to skip over it to get to the parameters, but you’ll seldom need to access or change it yourself.
Aug
8
comment Understanding pre/post assembly code for a function call in x86 IA32 assembly
@SpagGuy: By manipulate, I mean change the value; because %ebx could be changed, we preserve it. However, the x86 C calling convention doesn’t say that every register has to be preserved—only a few, and %ebp and %ebx are among those. The callee can trample all over %eax, for example, all it wants and leave the caller to deal with it.
Aug
8
comment Understanding pre/post assembly code for a function call in x86 IA32 assembly
@SpagGuy: Oops, you’re right! Yes, it was a copy-and-paste error that made %ebp point at the return address at 0x100; it actually points to the old %ebp at 0x0fc; this also caused your confusion about parameter location. Sorry! (Fixed now.)