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bio website bradford-larsen.net
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visits member for 5 years, 1 month
seen Jun 17 at 22:31

Making software better.


May
19
comment Implementation tips for whole-program static analysis for Haskell
user2407038, I'd consider parsing the source code an option. Although it seems that an option like that could result in a different build configuration than you get when building a library with cabal, for example.
Dec
10
comment Is it possible to extend the Instruments profiler on Mac OS X for a new language?
Thanks, these resources are helpful, and the sort of thing I'm looking for.
Mar
10
comment How can I prevent QuickCheck from catching all exceptions?
Upvoted because this solution addresses the particular use case (i.e. putting a time limit on the entire QuickCheck computation). Poring over the source code, it looks like QuickCheck is hard-wired to treat the UserInterrupt exception specially. Unfortunately, this solution doesn't quite answer my question: QuickCheck still swallows all but UserInterrupt!
Sep
11
comment Can an ANSI C-compliant implementation include additional functions in its standard library?
Your answer has allowed me to get the ANSI C89 code compiling again, via defining _POSIX_C_SOURCE 1. (This value is supposed to enable only the ANSI C89/ISO C90 features.) These feature test macros are not documented in the Mac man page for getline, and the feature_test_macros man page doesn't exist on the Mac. I wouldn't have found them without your answer. Although your answer now doesn't answer my original question (is an ANSI C implementation allowed to declare other functions in its standard library), your answer addresses my actual problem. I would upvote twice if I could!
Sep
11
comment Can an ANSI C-compliant implementation include additional functions in its standard library?
This is almost the answer I am looking for. Do you have a reference that justifies your claim that getline() must be available for the programmer's own use?
Aug
4
comment Efficient reduction of 2D array in CUDA?
So you are suggesting that I use 1D thread blocks, first reduce one dimension of the array, and then reduce the resulting 1D array? One major efficiency problem is that both dimensions in a 2D array are likely smaller than a 1D array's length, e.g. 4096x4096 vs ~16M. With a scheme like the one you describe, you end up with fewer thread blocks, less work per thread, and much lower utilization of the GPU overall compared to the 1D reduction.
Jun
20
comment Curious about HashTable efficiency
@Jon: Look at Nick Welch's graphs at the 10M entries mark. At 10M entries, for the runtime experiments, both the Boost unordered_map and the std unordered_map are quite close to each other. Ganesh also points this out. My results are consistent with what Nick Welch presents.
Jun
19
comment Curious about HashTable efficiency
@Jon: In the C++ tests I ran, switching to the built-in std::tr1::unordered_map gives slower results than boost::unordered_map.
Jun
19
comment Curious about HashTable efficiency
@Jon: In your post last year you never included C++ code or benchmark results, and the person who posted results in a comment tested with only 1M keys instead of 10M.
Jun
18
comment Curious about HashTable efficiency
@Jon See my comment in Don's post below. A C++ version using the Boost unordered_map class was only about 15% faster than the Haskell hash table version (using the larger default heap settings) on my system.
Jun
18
comment Curious about HashTable efficiency
Out of curiosity, I ran these micro-benchmarks on my own system, and whipped up a C++ version that uses the Boost hash table. Compared to the Haskell hash table version run with larger heap, its wall time was not much faster: C++ 1.613s, Haskell 1.862s. I was surprised!
Jun
18
comment Type-safe generic data structures in plain-old C?
I'm turned off by the complexity of C++. For my purposes, I will not be writing entire applications in C or C++, but core algorithmic code. C tends to be easier to call from other languages, is much simpler than C++, and makes it more apparent when memory allocation is being done. Although, using C rather than C++, I will miss namespaces, scoped destructors, and generic programming. But I am hoping the benefits of simplicity and understandability outweigh the loss of those features.
Jun
14
comment Type-safe generic data structures in plain-old C?
I am really turned off by option 1, as one gives up the help of the type system, and also because it adds a level of indirection.
Jun
14
comment Type-safe generic data structures in plain-old C?
I modified the post to emphasize that I want type safety, which is not provided by Option 1, and I want to avoid the extra indirection that using a single representation for all types would necessitate.
Jun
14
comment Type-safe generic data structures in plain-old C?
@dmckee A fully polymorphic object system in C would be a huge effort, and unless one extended a C compiler (rather than implementing the object system as a library), you would miss out on all sorts of static guarantees that could be provided by a language designed with polymorphic object systems in mind. In which case: why not just use C++? I want a simple solution.
Jun
14
comment Efficiently finding the shortest path in large graphs
I agree with Brandon. Although it really depends what the OP means by `real-time'.
Jun
14
comment Efficiently finding the shortest path in large graphs
Is your graph stored explicitly, in core memory? Or are you working with an inductive description of the graph?
Jun
14
comment Efficiently finding the shortest path in large graphs
BFS will only work if each edge in your graph has the same weight. Aside from this, you'll likely get much better performance from Dijkstra's algorithm, Uniform Cost Search, or A* than you would with BFS anyway.
Apr
4
comment How does Dijkstra's Algorithm and A-Star compare?
If there are several potential goal nodes, one could simply change the goal testing function to include them all. This way, A* would only need to be run once.
Apr
2
comment Why does my program occasionally segfault when out of memory rather than throwing std::bad_alloc?
Also, I think you mean malloc' rather than free'. The Linux man page for malloc does not make it sound like NULL will never be returned.