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1h
comment Must I place all dependent DLLs into the JDK's bin folder?
@smwikipedia - You can also use System.load() and System.loadLibrary() to load those indirect DLLs.
6h
comment How to log starting of Eclipse plug-ins / OSGi bundles?
Thanks for your authoritative answer. In the context of Eclipse, I still haven't got the changes to be written to the log file. And a breakpoint set in FrameworkLogEntry's bottommost constructor never got called unless I manufactured an error. I've tried setting -Declipse.log.level=INFO. Is there another option I should be setting for Eclipse or OSGi?
10h
comment How to log starting of Eclipse plug-ins / OSGi bundles?
Excellent! I'm not seeing them with the default settings. At what level are the bundle-state changes logged by OSGi to the Log Service?
11h
asked How to log starting of Eclipse plug-ins / OSGi bundles?
13h
comment SWT or Swing for Plugin Project
@Mishax - A few years after writing this answer, I tried bringing in just a 2D visualization panel based on Swing. I used the SWT/AWT bridge, with an additional layer provided at eclipse.org/articles/… . Interaction between the two UI toolkits still had some user-visible rough edges. Some rough edges were not visible on all operating systems. I ended up writing my own visualization in Eclipse Draw2D. For me, there would have to be a compelling reason to consider use of a Swing-based component in an SWT application.
14h
comment Must I place all dependent DLLs into the JDK's bin folder?
@smwikipedia - Requiring modification of the system or user %PATH% variable can be heavy-handed and a source of errors. It can be simpler and safer to install the dependent DLL alongside your application, and load it explicitly with System.load() or System.loadLibrary().
Apr
24
comment Sorting list from smallest-largest-smallest in Java
@ZackNewsham - Okay, I've added an answer reflecting that preference and your edit.
Apr
24
answered Sorting list from smallest-largest-smallest in Java
Apr
24
comment Sorting list from smallest-largest-smallest in Java
Good points if the OP is trying to build a histogram. The explicit request was for a small/large/small sort that looks like a histogram. Not clear why they want this order.
Apr
24
comment Sorting list from smallest-largest-smallest in Java
It looks like you're building a histogram of the values. But the OP appears to be trying to use the values as the counts for the histogram.
Apr
24
comment Sorting list from smallest-largest-smallest in Java
@ZackNewsham - Do you want equal values to be grouped together in the result? E.g., if fed {1,2,2,2,2,2,9}, would you expect {1,9,2,2,2,2,2}? Or are you simply looking for the left side to be the values at ascending odd indexes, and the right side to be the values at descending even indexes - {1,2,2,9,2,2,2}?
Apr
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
comment Java - Help on using “split()”
What have you written so far?
Apr
21
answered Overloading operator * in C++
Apr
19
comment Why is the “Default” access specifier allowed for interfaces?
@bot - For this question, there's a good reason why interfaces can have default access. For your related question, I'm not sure we have a good answer. There is some speculation at stackoverflow.com/questions/9046012/… . See in particular the first answer and its initial comments.
Apr
19
comment Why is the “Default” access specifier allowed for interfaces?
That related question is addressed (poorly) in stackoverflow.com/questions/5376970/protected-in-interfaces . I suspect that during the early design of Java, it was considered that public access was the most frequent use case. Still, I've seen cases where I'd like to specify protected access to prevent access outside the package when implemented by public classes.
Apr
19
revised Why is the “Default” access specifier allowed for interfaces?
added 168 characters in body
Apr
19
answered Why is the “Default” access specifier allowed for interfaces?
Apr
16
comment Java String references
Do you want to find the value of the references themselves in a debugger or in code? The latter has been addressed in stackoverflow.com/questions/580984/… .
Apr
16
comment Java String references
It's not a duplicate of that particular question - see his question at the end. One way to see the reference values is in a debugger.