4,117 reputation
1532
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

Jul
18
revised Trouble with lazy convolution fn in Clojure
Added second update
Jul
17
revised Trouble with lazy convolution fn in Clojure
minor code formatting
Jul
17
comment Trouble with lazy convolution fn in Clojure
With two billion doubles at 8 bytes each, you need 16GB RAM just to hold the doubles. At that scale you would probably want to look into chunking (process N numbers from xs at a time, gluing the results together at the boundaries afterwards) or laziness. I don't know of a simple, high-performance and functional way, I guess I'll have to leave that to the experts. For myself, I'm inclined to think that high-performance number crunching is one of those things that works best with mutability, if nothing else because you don't need to reinvent every algorithm you find in the literature.
Jul
16
comment Trouble with lazy convolution fn in Clojure
It should work for up to Integer/MAX_VALUE (about 2 billion) points, it's the max size of a Java array. I'm not seeing anything different for 1 million points. Sure it doesn't happen elsewhere? "Error in process filter" doesn't sound like it comes from the convolve function.
Jul
16
answered Trouble with lazy convolution fn in Clojure
Jul
14
comment Test whether a list contains a specific value in Clojure
Seems like a popular pastime, indeed. Perhaps we'll end up with a collection of all possible ways to implement it? :)
Jul
14
answered Test whether a list contains a specific value in Clojure
Jul
14
comment Test whether a list contains a specific value in Clojure
Strange indeed, contains? has to be the most misleadingly named function in Clojure :) Here's hoping that Clojure 1.3 will see it renamed to contains-key? or similar.
Jul
13
comment idiomatic way to replace (null x) function from common lisp in clojure
Your answer is better, since it also works with vectors, maps, strings etc. without converting them to seqs. I suppose the seq approach is suitable if you have an argument of unknown type and want to operate on a seq.
Jul
13
comment A way to strip returned values from java.io.File.listFiles in Clojure
Sure: (sort-by #(.lastModified %) (.listFiles (io/file "/etc"))) richhickey.github.com/clojure/…
Jul
13
answered idiomatic way to replace (null x) function from common lisp in clojure
Jul
12
comment In Clojure: Error executing a Java call with let inside a function but not in REPL
@bleakgadfly: Then your argument is a string rather than a number. You need to parse the string into a number, ex. using Long/parseLong
Jul
8
comment Clojure number crunching performance
I was wondering the same. Tim Brady's comments seem to suggest that he would like it refactored to be more general tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2009/12/15/Osborne-WF2-Clojure I can only guess that the author felt he had spent enough time on it and didn't bother with the refactoring. But no, I don't know the reason.
Jul
6
comment A way to strip returned values from java.io.File.listFiles in Clojure
Yes. Although listFiles returns both files and directories, so you would probably want to filter with #(.isFile %) first.
Jul
6
revised A way to strip returned values from java.io.File.listFiles in Clojure
non-matching para
Jul
6
answered A way to strip returned values from java.io.File.listFiles in Clojure
Jul
6
comment How do I use clojure.set/difference? Why won't it work on a PersistentSet?
JBristow: No, but you can turn your list into a set: (clojure.set/difference (set '(1 2)) (set '(1 3))) => #{2}
Jul
6
answered Clojure Metaprogramming Question (for a beginner!)
Jul
5
comment Clojure number crunching performance
BTW: Here is a Clojure implementation of a much larger benchmark involving concurrency and log file parsing: meshy.org/2009/12/13/widefinder-2-with-clojure.html Well worth a read if you are into large-scale performance.
Jul
5
comment Clojure number crunching performance
Thanks, glad you liked it. 1.5x: Sounds good, we're in the ballpark of each other. Mutable vs. immutable: I haven't tried immutable, feel free to give it a go. I would expect somewhere between "mutable 1.2" and "mutable 1.1", but it's hard to guess. Parallelizing: This particular problem is hard to parallelize in any case. In general, multithreading with mutable values is a lot harder than with immutable values, which is part of the reason Clojure defaults to immutable.