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Jul
25
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
29
awarded  Supporter
Apr
29
accepted How to track down what Apache process is doing
Apr
23
comment How to track down what Apache process is doing
BTW, I've confirmed that this was definitely the problem. The issue completely went away after fixing this as described above. My advice to anyone else in this type of situation: grep your code for while loops and be absolutely certain they both increment and have an upper limit.
Apr
23
comment How to track down what Apache process is doing
I agree completely. Unfortunately, when you're a one-man department responding to highly time-sensitive problems, sometimes solutions need to be patched together in bulk with an ad hoc testing approach. It's not ideal, but it usually works out ok. It's these strange circumstances like this which illustrate the major flaw with this approach, but still the benefits usually outweigh the flaw in terms of resources. It'll be nice to grow to a few programmers so that we can do things more methodically though.
Apr
22
answered How to track down what Apache process is doing
Apr
22
comment How to track down what Apache process is doing
I also run a cleanup function when the request finishes using: $request->pool->cleanup_register(\&cleanup); warns in this cleanup code indicate that the Perl code does cleanly exit the request.
Apr
22
comment How to track down what Apache process is doing
Additional info: I was originally running with ithreads without a threaded Apache. I tried recompiling Apache with threads and also Perl with ithreads disabled. No configuration combination impacted this problem.
Apr
22
asked How to track down what Apache process is doing
Apr
9
comment Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron
Stupid, stupid me! I actually figured this out and came to post the solution and found you beat me to it. This is what I get for being lazy and copying a block of code from somewhere else without realizing that I replaced a hard-coded file name with a variable. You wouldn't believe how long this had me stumped. I just couldn't figure out the permission problem, when it had nothing to do with permissions. Hopefully this will help someone else come to this realization quicker than for me.
Apr
9
awarded  Scholar
Apr
9
accepted Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron
Apr
9
comment Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron
Running as root does not work either, but instead of permission denied, it says: Could not open log file as root (really root): Inappropriate ioctl for device. This "Inappropriate ioctl for device" is actually not on the open, but on the print.
Apr
9
comment Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron
Good question! The cron part above is probably superfluous information because the same thing happens if I run sudo -u apache load.pl.
Apr
9
awarded  Editor
Apr
9
awarded  Student
Apr
9
revised Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron
added 46 characters in body
Apr
9
asked Permission denied on file owned by user with Perl and Cron