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seen Dec 19 '13 at 16:44

May
28
awarded  Student
Mar
2
comment ECDSA Signatures always return false on verification
@dchest, Thanks. So what in your opinion is the best way to construct a public ECPoint - given an EC private key in Java? Note that my requirements do not permit me to use BouncyCastle.
Mar
1
comment ECDSA Signatures always return false on verification
@dchest ECPublicKeySpec takes the following parameters ECPublicKeySpec(ECPoint w, ECParameterSpec params) according to this link (docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/security/spec/…). The "ec.getParams().getGenerator()" returns an ECPoint object, hence it's use here.
Feb
26
revised Looking for Signing algorithm that creates 32 or 16 byte keys in Java
added 1 characters in body
Feb
26
answered Looking for Signing algorithm that creates 32 or 16 byte keys in Java
Feb
26
comment ECDSA Signatures always return false on verification
Nope, this link doesn't solve the problem. (I actually used the approach mentioned there to create the signature). The problem here is that the signature won't verify.
Feb
26
asked ECDSA Signatures always return false on verification
Feb
26
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
Thanks for the compliment, @Ingo I did get some help to my problem - sincere thanks to jlordo, Ingo and everyone else.
Feb
25
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
By making a mistake in your judgement, you show that you are human. By making a second remark to justify your mistakes - you show that you are proud. I made a post yesterday explaining the actual use case (I think jlordo deleted some of his replies & the post). Find out from him what the exact scenario was. At the minimum, you owe everybody in this forum an apology - although I imagine the same disposition that made you justify your mistake - would also prevent you from making the apology. And by the way, when I think (and have verified) something is the truth - I do tell it.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@jlordo -I understand and will ALWAYS try to provide as much information in my questions to answer them intelligibly. But let's call a spade a spade. "This is nonsense, DeepCoder: if you do not have access to the byte array, you'll never be able to initialize a BigInteger with it. But if you do have access, you can as well save a copy. – Ingo 1 hour ago" - isnt just personal - it's actually a direct VERBAL insult- just pure interpersonal communication skills. Tell you what - I'll just forget about it and get back to work. Once more thanks all! Won't make any more posts about this.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@jlordo - Sorry for asking. Any code snippet example on how to prepend the 0x01 to the original byte array, and remove it after encoding (as proposed by Ingo)? Thanks again.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@Duncan - perhaps you do have a point. If Arrays.equals() returns true - then both arrays should be equals, however printing out signedBytes and convertBackSignedBytes (using System.out.println) - prints out different values (it is a known fact that BigInteger.toByteArray() does return a twos complement byte array) - which would be different if the input byte was unsigned). jlordo also mentioned he had been able to repoduce my problem.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@Ingo - I do have access to the original byte array (signedBytes[]) in the source file where I create the BigInteger. That BigInteger is then encoded to Base26 and transmitted to a completely different system where it is required to decode from Base 26 to original BigInteger - and then reconvert back to byte[] - hence the problem. This doesnt sound like nonsense to me. I obviously wouldnt spend all this time - if I could save a copy of the original byte array. You are forgiven for your remarks.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@ jlordo - thanks very much for your reply. I can safely say - the original byte[] length would be the same, say 42 bytes - since the signature is always of the same length. Interestingly - I also notice that even the size of convertBackSignedBytes[] is the same as signedBytes[], in fact Arrays.equals(convertBackSignedBytes, signedBytes) - actually returns true. However "someho" the byte[] arrays are different. With regards to your first question - I don't change the BigInteger in any way. It's the same value that I try to convert back to byte[]. Hope this helps. Again, thanks.
Feb
23
awarded  Commentator
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@Arian - thanks for your answer. I am sure that if I can get a pointer how to convert a byte[] array from twos complement form (which is what BigInteger returns) to the original unsigned byte[] - then I should be in business.
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@Duncan - like I stated the requirements of the application make it impossible to store the original byte array and reuse it. The signature verification occurs in a different computer system - and the orignal byte array is not accessible from there, not in the same source code file. I have edited the question, hopefully you would understand what I meant. I think there should be @ least a little focus on answering the original question.
Feb
23
revised BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
added 206 characters in body
Feb
23
comment BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?
@Duncan - there is a valid reason for the conversion. Like I mentioned the BigInteger value is used for something (in the case it is used for encoding the decimal value returned to Base 26 - that cant be done with the original byte[] array or can it?)
Feb
23
asked BigInteger to byte[] without twos complement?