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Jul
22
comment printing int in c by %s in printf
It's actually extremely common to check printf and scanf formats against the actual parameters. But Borland is so ancient that it is unlikely that it will check anything.
Jul
21
comment Boost log - formatting with severity_channel_logger
Thanks, just a small question. Without the formatter, the output contains a timestamp. How do I print the timestamp in the formatter? "TimeStamp" does not seem to exist, even though it is used in other examples. I solved this by registering a new global clock, but the timestamp was there before the formatter was added, so where did it go?
Jul
20
comment Boost log - formatting with severity_channel_logger
@sehe Added full code.
Jul
20
revised Boost log - formatting with severity_channel_logger
added 1955 characters in body
Jul
20
asked Boost log - formatting with severity_channel_logger
Jul
16
accepted Autotools complain about files compiled with different contexts
Jul
16
comment Python parsing stdin much faster than C++
@ChrisMaes There is no difference between indices and iterators with vector. This is the direct results of how X[Y] is defined in C and C++. If you are trying to say that dynamic allocation is slow, then yes, it is and there is no way around dynamic allocation if you need it.
Jul
16
comment Python parsing stdin much faster than C++
And btw. test the first character before you split :-D
Jul
16
comment Python parsing stdin much faster than C++
@kezzos There are some trivial inefficiencies in your code, but I would mainly look into boost::split stackoverflow.com/questions/7930796/…
Jul
16
comment Python parsing stdin much faster than C++
@ChrisMaes How is exactly is vector "not very fast"?
Jul
16
accepted Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
Jul
16
comment Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
@FilipeGonçalves This was on Linux. It might be a quirk of some older kernel version (we are using pretty old kernels), but fork did definitely fail in this circumstance.
Jul
16
comment Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
You are definitely not right with the second part of you answer. I have experienced fork() failing on a 4GB process with 3.5GB free memory.
Jul
16
comment Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
@Marian Hard to say. There could be upto 10k forks per second in peaks if the the events could be processed that fast.
Jul
16
comment Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
@BasileStarynkevitch Well, that still doesn't address my actual problem.
Jul
16
comment Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
@LouisMartin-Pierrat No, it won't use the memory, but the fork will fail unless you have space for the copy.
Jul
16
revised Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
added 28 characters in body; edited tags
Jul
16
asked Executing an external program when forking is not advisable
Jul
16
comment Simplest rule of thumb to avoid breaking strict-aliasing rules?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jul
16
comment Simplest rule of thumb to avoid breaking strict-aliasing rules?
@AaronMcDaid That is still undefined behavior, although the actual behavior of the compilers should be relatively consistent. But what can happen for example is: memset(); int value = some_buff[0]; .... int *another_buff = (int*)manipulator; printf("%d\n",another_buff[0]); in this can I can definitely see the compiler using the cached value from value.