109 reputation
7
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen 4 hours ago

I'm a professional software engineer specializing in .NET and SQL, with experience developing with financial and legal software, along with personal projects for windows phone and windows 8.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
27
comment How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
@JanAnderssen to let you know why you should modify an existing question instead of asking the same one again, please see this page on duplicate questions: blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/04/handling-duplicate-questions
Sep
27
comment How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
@JanAnderssen Updated. Still, you shouldn't ask the same question twice an hour apart. If you don't get the answer you want within a day, some activity to get more attention is more appropriate.
Sep
27
revised How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
Answer didn't work, improving.
Sep
27
comment How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
Looking into the dupe - this looks like the correct answer to me: fix the insert line to: comboBox1.Items.Insert(dr.GetInt32(0), dr.GetString(1) + dr.GetString(2)); That is your current top answer.
Sep
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
27
answered How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
Sep
27
comment How to make comboBox SelectedValue equal with SQL table ID
Why are you asking this question twice? stackoverflow.com/questions/19058504/…
Sep
27
comment Try catch and re-throw exception
My suspicion is that this was done so that a breakpoint could be put in to see the exception. That is a possible advantage, whereas losing your stack trace isn't usually an advantage. As others have noted, throw should have been used instead of throw ex (common mistake).
Sep
17
comment Convert array with random unique numbers to one with sequentially proceeding numbers?
@Blorgbeard the solution is nice because it is elegant and easy to understand. It isn't the most efficient solution, but it should be fast enough for most UI use cases and it is very easy to understand.
May
31
comment Image Pattern Matching in SQL Server
I didn't notice that Azure was the chosen DB, so I deleted my post. In similar situations without Azure, I would advocate using CLR from SQL only to asynchronously kick off a worker thread on another machine. I agree completely that you don't want your SQL DB running .NET code and potentially holding locks until relatively complex image processing is completed. Using CLR to initiate notifications is lightweight enough to run on your SQL server though, as long as they're processed elsewhere.
May
31
comment Join date and time strings into a DateTime
DateTime.Parse/TryPrase are both very fast too. TryParse is faster than catching the exceptions that Parse will throw if you get many parsing errors(that's why it exists). This gets trickier if your dates are not always in the same format though, so hopefully they're consistent, and the globalization context can help you there. Worst case scenario you can use the TryParseExact method, but that is much slower since it has to parse your expression, then parse the date. Even so, it is still UI fast if a person is entering these strings.
May
16
comment Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
@JimMischel Nice post. I'll admit that's about the level of performance gain I was expecting and I agree that the simplicity of the regex is better in most cases. That's true often with modern computers, improving performance by multiple orders of magnitude is often unnecessary (and a waste of time) because the CPUs are fast enough. It can still be fun to think about.
May
16
comment Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
@SLaks True, presizing the StringBuilder with the size of the starting string would be slightly faster in most cases (the exception being a long string that is mostly dupes), but this seemed good enough to be faster than regex. Either way, I think your regex solution is better in over 90% of cases, I just like thinking about speed.
May
13
comment use of a local variable in C# Parallel.For
You are declaring iPathMatrixOffset locally to the thread running the for loop in the top example. You can't use the same variable for iPathMatrixOffset value in different threads either, since the value of it will likely chance between when you set it and when you want to use it.
May
13
comment Delete User Unit test
You may want to find cases that should fail (i.e. trying to delete a user that doesn't exist) and make sure that they do fail in the expected manner.
May
13
comment Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
@JimMischel True. I fixed it to account for strings that start or end with ++.
May
13
revised Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
Re-worked a bit to fix the logic.
May
13
revised Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
Fixed an error that would be caused by running the code.
May
13
comment Reduce multiple consecutive equal characters from a string to just one
I like regex for relatively simple cases like this, but it is almost never the fastest way to do something. I think both of our answers, while they involve more code, might be faster, and seem correct and relevant. Maybe downvotes should require a comment explaining the downvote.