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seen Jul 31 at 13:53

Sep
12
comment How to determine an absolute-positioned element's container
I'm not sure how the JQ library does this, but our position extract uses self-recursion to accumulate the offsetLeft and offsetRight properties of the "element.offsetParent(s)" lineage. (I'm guessing it does something similar?) For some reason the values derived from the method aren't positioning the popup in the correct location. I'm wondering if I need to write a similar recursion process to determine the Positioning stack of a given element...?
Sep
12
asked How to determine an absolute-positioned element's container
Sep
1
awarded  Self-Learner
Aug
18
comment Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
"I don't know why you don't want to use the for comprehension..." A: my goal in posting the question was twofold: 1) learn an alternate method to accomplish something that I had already translated, and 2) hear alternative suggestions from those with more Scala knowledge than myself. Thanks for your answer/suggestions. -cheers
Aug
17
comment Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
"Just because you can write complex one-liners, doesn't mean you always should!"... I absolutely agree with you. In reality, I find that I don't particular use/like map-ops, but it appears others do as I find that I end up reading those operations in a lot of other-people's-code. This seemed like a good hands-on exercise to push my own knowledge boundry (and get some insight into how those with more experience in the language might go about producing the same functionality. -cheers
Aug
16
revised Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
added 413 characters in body
Aug
16
comment Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
Thanks. I think the yield might be the component that I was missing, and a quick list.length comparison between Procs and KVPair will should fine (at least for my purposes) as a getOrElse replacement. OOC, given your experience with Scala - is that how you'd recommend tackling the translation (regardless of what I was trying to learn)?
Aug
16
comment Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
I was namely curious as to whether a series of inline map() operations could be used to achieve the same outcome. I've seen some pretty elaborate map-ings using placholders and didn't know if my example could be re-tooled in that fashion, or not...before I wasted a lot of time/effort trying.
Aug
16
revised Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
added 14 characters in body
Aug
16
revised Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
deleted 21 characters in body
Aug
16
asked Pushing a series of Scala map operations into a separate list
Aug
16
revised JADE/SCALATE template error - InvalidSyntaxException
clarification
Aug
16
accepted Scala bitwise-like method argument
Aug
16
comment Scala bitwise-like method argument
Nice! That gives me a better sense of the boundaries for Scala's built-ins. Thank you.
Aug
16
comment Scala bitwise-like method argument
That might hold some possibilities. (I've updated the question to be a little more clear. hopefully) Are you saying to type the method argument as "opMode: Enumeration[OpMode]"? Or, maybe type it as a Set[OpMode] and then pass in the extracted Set from an externally defined enumeration? (Forgive it that is not the proper Scala-ese, is I'm still learning the language.) (which I assume would provide a faster look-up than List, especially if one were to use the RB sets..?)
Aug
16
revised Scala bitwise-like method argument
added 7 characters in body
Aug
16
revised Scala bitwise-like method argument
added 7 characters in body
Aug
15
revised Scala bitwise-like method argument
added 129 characters in body
Aug
15
asked Scala bitwise-like method argument
Aug
15
revised Scala parenthesis semantics
typo