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  • 57 votes cast
Mar
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
4
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
4
awarded  Peer Pressure
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
4
awarded  Scholar
Mar
4
awarded  Student
Mar
4
awarded  Supporter
Mar
4
awarded  Teacher
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Nov
27
accepted In-place editing, version control - what's your solution?
Nov
27
accepted Any interesting uses of Makefiles to share?
May
9
comment Elements with no size using position: absolute, inserting blocks above dynamically - what's the correct behaviour?
thanks for the answer, but I knew that already (it's stated in the question, at the end) - my question was why most browsers behave like they do when what you wrote is required. Perhaps there is some defined behaviour that is (should) be triggered and Safari is wrong, or it is undefined, or Safari is correct and the others aren't. I'd just like to know which is the case, I already know how to "fix" it.
May
9
asked Elements with no size using position: absolute, inserting blocks above dynamically - what's the correct behaviour?
Oct
18
revised Efficient and inefficient CSS selectors (according to Google, PageSpeed …)
added benchmarks
Oct
18
accepted Efficient and inefficient CSS selectors (according to Google, PageSpeed …)
Oct
18
comment Efficient and inefficient CSS selectors (according to Google, PageSpeed …)
2/5 seems to be 25% here. 2 questions were asking for examples, none of which is more "correct" than all the others (it would be arbitrary to choose one), one has no really useful answer (honestly).
Oct
18
comment Efficient and inefficient CSS selectors (according to Google, PageSpeed …)
Thanks for the link, while it does not provide any evidence that browsers actually do this nowdays, it is another data point. What I don't understand is why browsers would process the DOM in such an inefficient way when they can e.g. maintain a running list of ancestor node IDs/classes and applicable css rules while traversing the document to avoid checking rules with descendant (should be called ancestor?) selectors. It might simplify DOM manipulation, but it's bound to sabotage adoption of modern, more beautiful/readable css selector usage, useful esp. for white label sites ...
Oct
18
asked Efficient and inefficient CSS selectors (according to Google, PageSpeed …)
May
19
accepted How do you work around memcached's key/value limitations?
Apr
22
answered prioritizing gearman job servers?