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seen Sep 24 '14 at 10:58

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comment How can callbacks modify state of objects in pure functional programming?
Reactive programming has nothing to do with callbacks. The best explanation of reactive programming I have seen is the following: let a = 1 let b = 2 let c = a + b print(c) ;prints 3 let a = 2 print(c) ;prints 4 This is not what I am looking for.
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asked How can callbacks modify state of objects in pure functional programming?
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answered What is the maximum reference count in std::shared_ptr? What happens if you try to exceed it?
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accepted Which compiler between Visual Studio 10 and GCC 4.5 is correct regarding operator overloading and argument-dependendent lookup?
Jun
15
comment Which compiler between Visual Studio 10 and GCC 4.5 is correct regarding operator overloading and argument-dependendent lookup?
Thanks, I get it now.
Jun
15
revised Which compiler between Visual Studio 10 and GCC 4.5 is correct regarding operator overloading and argument-dependendent lookup?
Added clarification to the question.
Jun
15
comment Which compiler between Visual Studio 10 and GCC 4.5 is correct regarding operator overloading and argument-dependendent lookup?
VS10 accepts this because language extensions are on by default. After disabling them, I get the error in VS10 too. But I don't understand why c++ tries to invoke Foo(const Foo &) instead of Foo(const Bar &) at c = a >> b. The operator >> returns a Bar object, right? so the code should compile. Why is a temporary instance of Foo is created?