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seen Nov 20 at 19:21

Aug
31
comment How to plot with minimum no. of observations using facet_wrap, ggplot2
If you're willing to go with data.table rather than data.frame and facet_wrap, you can generate your (separate) plots easily without changing the data: DT[, if(.N > your_min_number_of_cases) ggplot(), by=list(your faceting variables)].
Aug
10
comment Merging factor with non-factor in data.table leads to unexpected results
For even more 'fun' try NatName[data] or data[NatName]. The same has happened to me in pretty much the same context quite often, so I try hard to remember to keep both in character form. As you say, a warning would be good though.
Aug
8
revised lme() different results each run under Revolution R (MKL to blame?)
Update: Isssue seems fixed in Revo R 7.2.0
Jul
16
comment X-axis configuration in a plot with data.table
Just use pdf() instead of x11(), and you get all figures as separate PDFs. Play with pdf(onefile=FALSE) if you need a single file. And I think there should be a dev.off() before NULL, to close the graphics device (with single-figure files). Not sure about x11() but with pdf() files remain locked until you close the device (on Windows).
Jun
6
answered How to read numeric header in data.table with the fread function?
Mar
26
comment Nested groupings with data.table
@Arun Better safe than sorry, I've managed to shoot myself in the foot changing the default using option(), which you have graciously provided :) Re the second point, your answer does what the OP wants, my comment was directed at him, just in case he'd missed the difference.
Mar
26
comment Nested groupings with data.table
@Arun @Riccardo : I see this is more than a month old, but I have two comments I think might be important. First, the .SD[CJ()] part works as intended only because nomatch=NA by default. Might want to specify it explicitly just to be safe if the default is ever changed... Second, given the way it is used within .SD, unique() only includes the values of id and membr which are found after the data table has been subset according to by= rather than in the whole data table. This may be the intended behavior here (different sets of membr for each event) but maybe not.
Feb
21
answered How to assign value to zero object data.table? R
Feb
20
comment Recoding of huge matrix in R
You need to be more explicit what you mean by "efficient", as it can relate to both RAM and CPUs (at least). Breaking up the matrix into single-column data.tables and using the foreach package to use all available cores might well be much faster. Depending on the relative size of m and n.
Feb
7
asked fread() fails with missing values in integer64 columns
Jan
16
comment different results with data frame and data table in r
In addition, with data.table I think it would be faster to use := to generate your g variable (and making it integer or character may even speed things further that factor). Using DT[][,y] should also be faster than using DT$y but I can't point to a source at the moment. Do some benchmarking on your machine if speed is important.
Jan
16
comment different results with data frame and data table in r
Could you please post the raw data for secid==191432? Also, does this do what you want: DT <- data.table(pcretw); setkey(DT, weeknum, secid); DT[, retain3 := max(dateInt, na.rm=TRUE), by=c("weeknum","secid")]? Or maybe I am missing what you want to achieve.
Jan
16
comment Why PLM creates massive objects and fails to open them
This is not really an answer so I post it as a comment. I am having similar issues -- plm (with twoways) and lm (with dummies) want more than 50GB (32GB of RAM + 20GB swap) of memory for a dataset of 200k rows and 4 variables + individual and time effects, 11MB in memory. I ended up just using gretl, which estimates the model in less than a second and uses less than 100MB of RAM. Stata also easily estimates the model (gretl and Stata results look identical) but you need a not-exactly-inexpensive license for it.
Dec
29
comment R on Windows: character encoding hell
I agree with @aseidlitz -- it is most likely a matter of display. Import your data, then export it back to csv and check with external program. In my case cyrillic shows properly in the RStudio console OR the Viewer tab, never both. In Revolution's IDE, I get garbage in the console, but correct output in the object browser.
Dec
26
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
@BrianD To avoid copy&paste of code (the write.table() part is almost identical) you can define a variable if(first time through inner loop) append.to.file<-TRUE else append.to.file<-FALSE and call write.table(append=append.to.file,...). Easier to read, and also if you decide to change the output format in the future.
Dec
24
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
@hadley This seems to run noticeably faster with manual gc(). Just tested on a virtual machine (Win XP 32 bit, 512MB RAM + 3GB swap file). The number of lines fread reads is important to generate the different times. I do not know whether due to R- or to OS-specific stuff. Could be I am doing something wrong (the code is far from pretty and efficient) but does not look like placebo. Maybe suboptimal threshold to run gc() in a low-RAM, high-swap-file scenario?
Dec
24
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
@MattDowle Yes, of course you are absolutely correct, and I am aware of what you write. The 'slow' part referred to using virtual memory, not to fread. Maybe I should have posted the virtual memory part under the question, not under the solution. Unfortunately I cannot edit, just delete it now (and will do so if you want me to). data.table has saved me a lot of time, a big "thank you" to you! The SSD recommendation was an intermediate solution, my old PC already had the max supported 8GB of RAM, and it was cheaper to get an SSD than a whole new PC (which I eventually could afford/justify).
Dec
23
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
@hadley I do not know how gc() works exactly (will read what you linked to) but my informal impression was that it was never triggered automatically. Code where I used it manually after every RAM-intensive operation did seem to work faster. Maybe because of the virtual memory I had to use? Too bad I moved to a machine with 32GB of RAM and cannot provide exact tests to support this...
Dec
23
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
@MattDowle My comment about fread() was that it has always worked fine for me, and is not linked to the amount of RAM. My problem was similar to that in the question, just a bit larger (25 tab-separated files, 220-450MB uncompressed, ~ 9GB total, also on Win 7 64-bit, on an Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 with 8GB RAM). In his case probably 6*RAM is overkill by far (I just copy&pasted, and I need more RAM because I was reshaping and doing other stuff after the importing). I did everything in R as in my case the files had different column order.
Dec
22
comment How to append several large data.table objects into a single data.table and export to csv quickly without running out of memory?
fread() works fine in my experience. Make sure you have virtual memory turned on with something like memory.limit(size = 6 * 8192). This is slow but works. (And add 'buy an SSD' to your 'buy RAM' list ;)).