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Mar
20
awarded  Yearling
Feb
25
awarded  Great Answer
Dec
23
comment Writing to two file descriptors by only one operation
I guess I should clarify; when I did this, i did a dup2 to make my program's stdout print to the tee process, and when the program closed the results I described took place. I didn't take too much care to look in to the exact mechanism for it, but that's what happened.
Dec
23
comment Writing to two file descriptors by only one operation
This is more or less what I use, but there's a bit of an issue that may or may not matter, depending on your use case: If you're running a program from the command line, the child process (your tee program) doesn't necessarily flush when it normally would, and more interestingly, when your program finishes the tee stays briefly open, meaning you don't get a prompt back quit like you usually would (tee still writes to the screen for a bit, meaning your prompt gets buried in text). All in all this approach "pretty much" works, and it's dirt simple so...
Dec
2
comment Is this technically an O(1) algorithm for “Hello World”?
The state of the machine it's run on becomes part of the input in this case; Datetime.now is an input.
Nov
9
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
22
comment Bool function always returning false
Where you have your while loop, your if is wrong. you need str2[first] == str2[last] beause you're checking that both first is less than last, and that first is the same as last, which cannot both be true.
May
30
comment How to sort a matrix in the ascending order by the sum of its row in Python?
use the sort method of the list object (or the sorted free function) and pass sum as the key. So sorted(A, key=sum) should work (or something like it, I haven't tested).
Apr
16
awarded  Informed
Apr
13
awarded  Caucus
Mar
20
awarded  Yearling
Feb
28
comment How to slice several strings in a list?
Also, if you want to use map, you can use import operator; map(operator.itemgetter(slice(start, stop, step)). Not saying you should use this, just saying it's an option that exists. slice(start, stop, step) is what item[start:stop:step] receives, and operator.itemgetter is a function that calls slice on an object. It's worth looking into because it's a useful thing to know about.
Jan
24
accepted Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
Jan
24
comment Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
@hobbs yes, sorry, I was aware of that, but I didn't mention it. That was my fault and I should have been more clear.
Jan
24
comment Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
Ahhh. That's a pain. I appended them to the CFLAGS and it worked. Rather irritating. I had another FreeBSD 10.1 vm set up (the same way) and it worked on that. I'm not sure what the difference is between them; I'll have to investigate. Thanks!
Jan
24
comment Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
That's what the CPPFLAGS := in the makefile is supposed to do. I don't know why it's not applying the cppflags; It does compile okay if I run cc -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=700 and so on manually.
Jan
24
comment Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
It appears to be the case that the cppflags aren't getting applied. I can compile it manually using cc -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=700 ... and so on. but running just make doesn't seem to be working.
Jan
24
asked Clang fails to compile a c11 program, citing that “implicit declaration is illegal in c99”
Jan
9
comment How to write a one-byte value in a binary file-java
If you want to write the leading zeroes, then you need to write them as strings or something. If you just use something like int i = 0000000, the compiler will see that and say "Okay, I have an octal literal. A bunch of zeroes. So zero." It will ignore them. Put them inside a string if you want to keep them and print them.
Jan
9
comment Pipe every bash output to file
The reason it's only printing after the whole thing runs is that tee is buffering it internally. If you were just running it normally, the standard output stream would get flushed after every line, but tee has in internal buffer and only flushes to stdout when that gets sufficiently full. You would find that if you ran 100000.times do |i| instead, that it would print before it was done running. Just FYI