Petros Drakoulis

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visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Jun 13 at 14:25

Apr
2
comment Windows Threading C++/CLI: How to pass managed parameters to threads
@o_weisman thank you a lot
Mar
23
comment Windows Threading C++/CLI: How to pass managed parameters to threads
I don't know. I am new to C++ / CLI and i chose this way of threading after a tutorial i read. I have used pthreads in the past for unix and given that the parameter requirements were about the same (a pointer to void) i guess that this way of passing parameters to threads is somewhat standard.
May
9
comment Is there any performance gain from using final modifier on non-primitive static data?
@AndrewLazarus thank you. very good article.
May
9
comment Is there any performance gain from using final modifier on non-primitive static data?
@AndrewLazarus Yes, i have heard the same thing. But what about the most common JIT (hotspot i think)?
May
9
comment Is there any performance gain from using final modifier on non-primitive static data?
I am making a skeleton on which other code will be put. I just want to make sure this skeleton is as much performance-wise optimized as possible. It is just a theoretical question though. Putting final in every non-changing variable is not that much time-consuming. I am a worshiper of clean code though, and i would like to avoid using extra keywords that do nothing if possible, but at the same time i can not stand the possibility that it would be faster (even slightly) if i'd use 'em ;-)
May
9
comment Is there any performance gain from using final modifier on non-primitive static data?
@Brian Roach What do you mean? static final primitives' value is known at compile time. for example: static final int me = 10;
Apr
23
comment The hunt for the fastest Hamming Distance C implementation
hm... hamming will be calculated many times (thousands) for the same String but i don't have access to the caller. Your solution would be very good if i could make caller store strings padded at 32 bytes and provide them that way. In current implementation caller provides two char* and a length up to which char* is guaranteed to be valid. After that it's probably trash, and even if not, i can not risk it. Good though though...
Apr
22
comment Bit Operation For Finding String Difference
And something more. The author said that his code was "hopelessly slow". One reason i am writing this is to offer him an alternative that is "get rid of the Strings" (if possible) and use char*. In the above setup difference was huge when we transformed all Strings to char*. It could be a solution for him to do the same. (i did not notice how old the post was)
Apr
22
comment The hunt for the fastest Hamming Distance C implementation
The whole padding phase must be too expensive for my case because it involves zeroing an array of 32 bytes and then copy the char* till na. I know it's just 2 x memset + 2 x memcpy but i don't think traversing and compairing 4-31 bytes will be costier.
Apr
22
comment The hunt for the fastest Hamming Distance C implementation
I did not try this due to complexity and the relatively small size of strings involved. Thank you anyway though
Apr
22
comment Bit Operation For Finding String Difference
(1) Gcc 4.7.2 for Intel Xeon X5650. (2-3-4 etc...) I "resurected" this, as you say, because i have already started a new thread which is considered a duplicate of this. This answer serves as a good answer to my original thread that i can not answer, so i answer my thread here. If this answer does not fit here means that my thread is no duplicate of this. Can i throw this answer to my "duplicate" post some other way?
Apr
22
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
Thank you. I will try to do so. But i guarantee you that in Linux gcc 4.7.2 with flag -std=c+11 there is emplace() for unordered_map. I participated in a contest 2 weeks ago and with the compiler being 4.7.2 i used it. It's the very program i try to recompile for windows...
Apr
22
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
The project i try to compile for windows, was made in Linux Gcc 4.7.2 a month ago. There is emplace() in linux gcc 4.7.2
Apr
22
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
I have come to believe that i can not use c++ 11, or at least all of it, with 4.6.
Apr
22
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
same error: 'class std::unordered_map<std::basic_string<char>, dictionaryWord>' has no member named 'emplace'
Apr
21
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
@milleniumbug 4.6.2 (i installed mingw this week)
Apr
21
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
i tried both c++11 and c+11, message is the same
Apr
21
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
'class std::unordered_map<std::basic_string<char>, dictionaryWord>' has no member named 'emplace'. Emplace is defined in c++11. So i need to add c++11 support, but when i do it sais: unrecognized command line option '-std=c+11'
Apr
21
comment C++11 functionality with MinGW
Neither works (i allready have c++0x ON)
Apr
13
comment The hunt for the fastest Hamming Distance C implementation
@MikeDunlavey Quite often. I tried checking memcmp() first and is slower than standard