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Feb
18
comment list_entry() in list.h returning a warning
@Lundin There's no technical difference between code that uses typedefs and code that doesn't, but that's not to say that it's entirely stylistic. One useful result is that it's clear to all users of a struct that they're dealing with a struct, and not something that can be easily passed as a function argument like an integer. Likewise, when stack space is limited you wouldn't want to accidentally declare a huge struct as a local stack variable.
Feb
17
comment list_entry() in list.h returning a warning
@Lundin Structure typedefs are frowned upon in Linux kernel code. This would be bad advice for anyone intending to share code upstream.
Feb
9
comment Disabling all interrupts to protect CPU register state on multi processor systems
spin_lock_irqsave disables interrupts unconditionally. The only difference is that it preserves the old state so when you exit the critical region you can safely put the processor back the way it was. If you're ever in doubt, use spin_lock_irqsave() and spin_lock_irqrestore(). There is nothing "more all-encompassing" about the non-save/restore versions; they have the same effect, but they assume you know that interrupts are enabled when you start.
Feb
4
comment Why does LLVM add two extra instructions for the same program?
It seems a little unfair to compare compilers' assembly output without using the optimizer.
Jan
31
comment kernel virtual address translation
That simple mapping makes the implementation of virt_to_phys() easy: as you said, just subtract PAGE_OFFSET. But paging is enabled-- this allows the translation of virtual addresses to physical in hardware, as instructions are fetched and data is accessed.
Jan
26
comment Magic numbers of the Linux reboot() system call
Dec 28, 1969 is Linus Torvalds' birth date [Wikipedia]. The others appear to be his children's birth dates, though I can only confirm one was born in December 1996 [random googling].
Dec
16
comment Memory access after ioremap very slow
What's more, if your driver knows when hardware and host cpu will be accessing the data, you can use streaming buffers with the dma_sync_* functions. This allows caching to stay enabled, but forces a cache flush operation (on archs that require it) as the buffer is about to be handed off from cpu to hardware or vice versa.
Dec
16
comment Memory access after ioremap very slow
What you're talking about is a coherent DMA buffer. If you use the kernel routines for allocating a coherent buffer, the kernel will automatically make it uncacheable if your architecture requires it. (x86 does not.) Don't reinvent the wheel; use the functions that are there for this very purpose.
Dec
16
comment Memory access after ioremap very slow
Different architectures handle coherency of buffers used for DMA differently; Chapter 15 of LDD3 talks about using coherent buffers vs. streaming buffers. That should explain the basics of how to do DMA while handling the hairy cache issues automatically. The exact code may have evolved in newer kernels, though.
Nov
30
comment How do disk controllers handle concurrent writes to same sector in absence of write barriers?
In fact, hardware does not guarantee time ordering among queued writes to the same sector. I found this quite surprising, but at least 3 kernel hackers at LSF 2010 agreed that this is the case. If a filesystem cares, it is supposed to wait for completion (though it could formerly have used barriers). Presumably the same is true of apps using O_DIRECT. Of course, the kernel request queue will probably merge overlapping requests before they hit hardware, so this behavior may be difficult to see.
Nov
23
comment What triggers the release of 'managed' pci resources?
I should have been clearer. I do other things other than just iomap; the mananged subsystem should release all of them at once. pcim_iounmap will only release them one at a time.
Nov
10
comment Function caller in linux kernel
That's some impressive jujitsu.
Nov
8
comment Restrict address range accessible by Eclipse/GDB
Excellent. That does look like what I need, though I think I need to upgrade my version of GDB to one that supports 'set mem inaccessible-by-default'.
Oct
13
comment How do you extract only the contents of an ELF section
The following works for me: objcopy -O binary -j .text /usr/bin/lpr mylprtext
Oct
7
comment convert jiffies to seconds
I'm not certain I understand: does this mean that HZ is not actually the number that the questioner wanted?
Sep
2
comment How can I use spinlocks on list entries inside the linux kernel?
Read/write locks don't actually imply that everyone that does writing must take the writer lock. You can have threads modifying the list while holding only the reader lock-- think of the reader lock as "multiple threads allowed in simultaneously" and the writer lock as "only one thread allowed." As long as your remove-item code doesn't execute frequently (requiring exclusive access via the writer lock), the other threads can run in parallel. If your remove-item routine must run frequently, you may need a different solution. Maybe don't free() them immediately, but set them aside for later?
Jul
30
comment spin_lock on non-preemtive linux kernels
@happy_emi To answer your other question, while holding a spinlock you should not make calls that may block, sleep, or reschedule, as that could also lead to deadlock.
Jun
29
comment Determine the path of the executing BASH script
Your second line has an extra double-quote character.
Jun
15
comment core at which function is running
This isn't correct, as tasklets are not processes or threads.
Jun
1
comment GCC how to block system calls within a program?
It's possible to execute a syscall without making use of any libraries, so if you expect to build a system secure against malicious users, using LD_PRELOAD is not sufficient.