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Aug
30
comment Is there an easy way to replace this in C, without using a large external library?
The #define can go into the .c file just fine, if you're only doing this in one place.
Aug
30
answered Is there an easy way to replace this in C, without using a large external library?
Aug
20
revised NSCollectionView inside another NSCollectionView
reformatted
Aug
18
comment Why is this free failing when calling execvp?
Heap corruption elsewhere? When did 0x024c1408 (the block being free'd) get allocated in your application? It doesn't seem to have anything to do with the arguments to execvp.
Aug
8
answered What are some practical uses for const-qualified variables in C?
Aug
1
comment How to hint to GCC that a line should be unreachable?
The old lint tool used to allow the comment /*NOTREACHED*/, which would indicate code that shouldn't be reachable... Not sure what the behavior of the tool was when it encountered that comment.
Jul
29
comment Combine two 32bit efficiently? - C
@Doori Bar: to re-use the original allocation, you need to guarantee that the original allocation is suitable for re-use this way. The way to guarantee this is for the original allocation to use an array, instead of independent variables.
Jul
29
comment Combine two 32bit efficiently? - C
If I understand you correctly, then no, there isn't. If the variables are stored adjacent in memory, it might be possible to coerce the address of one of them to a 64-bit type so that the memory used by the 64-bit pointer overlays precisely those two variables, but there's no portable / robust way to guarantee that that will be the case. Consider that the variables may not be stored in memory at all, but rather in CPU registers.
Jul
29
answered Combine two 32bit efficiently? - C
Jul
21
comment How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
Also, the reason for putting the objects into an archive is so that the linker can essentially ignore any order issues on the command-line itself - your .o file for the entry point precedes the .a file containing all your library routines on the cmd line, so the linker has the ability to scan for .o files from the archive as required, instead of only scanning forward through .o files on the cmd line. (I had thought that using the archive would have fixed your problem before, but was evidently wrong.) Coupling file-per-function with the .a file, you shouldn't need to worry about cmd line order.
Jul
21
comment How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
@owst: operating under the assumption that what you ultimately want is for your linker to work reliably, rather than to completely understand what's going on (which I still can't completely explain, though I have some idea), the objective is to simplify the linker's task. The linker links code at object-file granularity, so if you have two functions in an object, only one of which is used, the linker will still scan for unresolved references from the other function, and give errors if any of those references can't be resolved. By using file-per-function, you don't get that effect.
Jul
20
comment How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
@owst: If all else fails, you can try function-per-file style, probably coupled with the archive method I suggested in an earlier comment.
Jul
19
comment Refactoring respond_to? method in the if-elsif-else condition
@Marc-André Lafortune: Your answer was slightly earlier. Also, I didn't realize that about the argument to find... I'd consider your version better.
Jul
19
answered Refactoring respond_to? method in the if-elsif-else condition
Jul
19
accepted What does void(U::*)(void) mean?
Jul
19
comment What does void(U::*)(void) mean?
But... U is a class, not a pointer. You mean, the parameter to is_class_tester is a pointer to a member function? That would make sense.
Jul
19
asked What does void(U::*)(void) mean?
Jul
15
comment How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
Try putting the object files (other than the entry point) into an archive with (rm -f libfoo.a ; ar -cr libfoo.a a.o b.o c.o ; ranlib libfoo.a), then linking against libfoo.a instead of the individual object files.
Jul
15
answered How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
Jul
15
comment How can adding a function call cause other symbols to become undefined when linking?
Your linker script sets the entry symbol to start - in what file is start defined?