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bio website cznp.com
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"If you really want to understand something, the best way is to try and explain it to someone else.

That forces you to sort it out in your mind. And the more slow and dim-witted your pupil, the more you have to break things down into more and more simple ideas. And that's really the essence of programming.

By the time you've sorted out a complicated idea into little steps that even a stupid machine can deal with, you've learned something about it yourself." - Douglas Adams


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comment C++, using a key class as a key of access for a group of classes
Yes, for the Attorney-Client idiom, I did not read that from the OP's question. From his view he has no need for the key if I see it correctly. But doing the AC idiom you need a second class that has only private methods (which are the privileged methods) and the 3rd class as his friend.
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comment C++, using a key class as a key of access for a group of classes
Why would you need the key, if the function is private, then only friends can access it. No need for the key, the private restriction is enough, unless I am missing something.
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