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Apr
18
comment Applying var or #' to a list of functions in Clojure
Yes it does: (map resolve '[+ - /]) => (#'clojure.core/+ #'clojure.core/- #'clojure.core//). What have you tried that didn't work as expected?
Apr
16
comment How do you block a thread until a condition becomes true?
I happened to look at #clojure logs and it seems that you're actually interested in a scenario where a shared resource is to be exclusively held by the thread that's using it, then returned to the "available" state for the next thread to pick up once the current thread no longer needs it. You can do that with core.async using a channel with a buffer of size 1: (1) create the channel -- (chan 1), putting this where appropriate -- and put the resource on the channel; (2) use (<!! the-channel) to ask for exclusive hold on the resource (blocking); (3) when done, return the resource with >!!.
Apr
7
comment Overlapping partition in core.async
Agreed that it's probably best to just use arrays, though.
Apr
7
comment Overlapping partition in core.async
Re: eating memory, clojure.core/subvec does indeed produce vectors that hold on to the original input vector, so the internal buffer will eventually hold on to all the values put on the channel (and the vectors put on the out channel will hold on to the values seen up to the point when they were produced). One simple fix would be to call vec on the result of the subvec call on each iteration; the result will be a fresh vector constructed in linear time. Alternatively, you could use core.rrb-vector for real (non-view) O(log n) slicing.
Apr
6
comment Add optional docstring to def* macros
def also accepts an optional docstring argument, but this is not much help in writing macros that take an optional docstring and a body (of arbitrarily many expressions) and expand directly to def.
Feb
28
comment Clojure: How to merge vector of maps that have the same value
Here's one possible left outer join implementation.
Feb
20
comment Clojure: multiple let bindings
Just to be clear, you'd use as-> inside doto: (doto 1 (as-> foo (+ foo 2) (* foo 3) (println foo))) prints 9 and returns 1.
Feb
20
comment Clojure: multiple let bindings
It transforms (as-> expr sym form1 form2 ...) into (let [sym expr sym form1 sym form2 ...] sym). See (doc as->) at the REPL (>= 1.5.0) or follow this link to see the same on the Clojure API page. (I couldn't find a stable link to the 1.5.x API, so I'm linking to "current" instead.)
Feb
20
comment What's the use of the second argument on extend-protocol
As mentioned in my answer, if you extend your protocol to String and then to Long, the implementation to String doesn't disappear. So that's why foo still works on strings. But now you also have an implementation for Long in place that doesn't make sense, so if you call foo with a long, rather than tell you there's no matching implementation, Clojure will attempt to use the one you provided and run into a problem while doing that.
Feb
20
comment What's the use of the second argument on extend-protocol
Not sure I understand. If you're asking for final clarification on the type arguments to extend-protocol, they are there to tell Clojure which type(s) to extend the protocol to. It's impossible to determine statically which types the given implementatioin makes sense for (if only because new types can be created dynamically at any time) and even if it were possible the programmer might not want all such extensions to be made.
Feb
20
comment What's the use of the second argument on extend-protocol
:-) x is in fact implicitly type-hinted here (to the type the protocol is being extended to), but the type hint is only used to avoid reflection.
Feb
16
comment def a variable after binding *ns* to something else
@Rayne - On your conscience be it. :-P sethwm - Well, Rayne is certainly the person to be in touch with in that case. Out of curiosity, why not use / adapt clojail?
Feb
14
comment mapping over each element in a destructured list of vectors in clojure
Sure. If I understand correctly, you want to sum up each individual grade vector and obtain a collection of all resulting sums. Letting gs refer to the collection of grade vectors with weights applied, (mapv #(apply + %) gs) will produce a vector of sums. The whole thing could be condensed to (->> grades-1 (map (partial percentify-vector [10.0 20.0 15.0 25.0 30.0])) (mapv #(apply + %))).
Feb
12
comment How to improve ClojureScript performance
Sure, it would work fine. The end result would still be a persistent vector of persistent array maps, with all the performance implications. (Well, actually the OP uses very small hash maps, so this approach would probably perform slightly better.)
Feb
10
comment Destructuring map of map with unknown keys
No worries. Also, you absolutely can destructure maps with dynamic keys, just edited the answer to reflect this. Sorry for the confusion, not sure what I was thinking. It's just the names of the locals that can't be dynamic. Also added a seq-based alternative to the val / first solution.
Feb
10
comment Destructuring map of map with unknown keys
Oh, additionally, if complex-map is a map literal with a complex expression as key, somekey's expansion will evaluate this expression twice: (somekey {(println :foo) {:bar 1}}) prints :foo twice.
Feb
10
comment Destructuring map of map with unknown keys
This will only work when complex-map is passed to the macro as a literal: {:foo inner-map}. If it is not, then it will break: (let [complex-map {:foo {:bar 1}}] (somekey complex-map)).
Jan
12
comment core.async and 10,000 processes for animation - what is the actual benefit in this scenario?
@lgrapenthin Cheers, happy to hear that.
Jan
3
comment Why does `(def ^:private name 1 ) eval to (def namespace/name 1)?
You should use the regular quote with macroexpand-1; with it your call becomes (macroexpand-1 '(def- foo 12)), which returns the actual expansion of (def foo 12). With the backtick, the form that gets macroexpanded is (namespace/def- namespace/foo 12); it is this form that expands to (def namespace/foo 12), which is an error (the "name" symbol passed to def may not be namespace-qualified). The metadata issue is as described in kotarak's answer to the question linked to be Guillermo.
Jan
2
comment How is the clojure.lang.Reflector used in implementation of interop methods
When it has insufficient information about the type of obj. For example, if obj is a non-type-hinted parameter of a function, then there is no way for the compiler to figure out what obj might turn out to be at runtime. In fact, it's possible that the function will be used with objects of many types which all have a method called someMethod, but are completely unrelated. The set of all such types may even grow at runtime.