31,880 reputation
460123
bio website poita.org
location England, United Kingdom
age 27
visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen 13 hours ago

Games programmer at the Codemasters Racing Studio.

Twitter: @Poita_
Homepage: http://poita.org
Google+: https://plus.google.com/113406528604077476949


Feb
17
comment Interesting Problem (Currency arbitrage)
@Neeraj, I knew of the log transformation because this is a well-known problem with a well-known solution. As Kenny says, it is also well known that you can transform products to sums using logarithms.
Feb
17
comment Interesting Problem (Currency arbitrage)
By product path, he means that the weight of the path is the product of its edge weights instead of the (usual) sum.
Feb
17
revised Interesting Problem (Currency arbitrage)
added 788 characters in body
Feb
17
comment Interesting Problem (Currency arbitrage)
My apologies, I misread the question. Ah, so you are looking for an opportunity cycle in the graph. That calls for the Bellman-Ford algorithm with the edge weights transformed such that the w' = -ln(w). The reason for that transformation is that it reduces the problem to finding a negative cycle in the graph. I will update my solution with the correct code.
Feb
17
answered Interesting Problem (Currency arbitrage)
Feb
16
awarded  Organizer
Feb
16
revised Find boundaries of an array of objects with only the boundaries of the objects
edited tags
Feb
16
answered C++ pointers to class instances
Feb
16
comment How to determine how many bytes an integer needs?
This won't be very useful if he needs an arbitrary number of bytes.
Feb
15
answered Type - Subtype relation. Something seems unclear
Feb
15
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
13
comment Creating a directory In C or C++
Boost is also cross platform.
Feb
13
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
@rmn, if you think that's a lot easier to implement then go ahead and prove me wrong. If you know anything about algorithms then you'll be well aware that the only difference between a DFS (what I suggested) and a BFS/flood-fill (what you suggested) is the fact that DFS uses a stack and BFS uses a queue (go ahead, change the stack in my code to a queue and it will be a BFS). Therefore, it takes the EXACT same amount of time to implement, right down to the very character.
Feb
13
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
@DVK, it took me about 4-5 minutes to write that.
Feb
12
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
+1 for not suggesting a flood fill from each wolf.
Feb
12
revised Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
added 21 characters in body; added 20 characters in body
Feb
12
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
Doing a flood fill on every wolf would not work in this problem. Imagine a 100 x 100 grid with a wolf on every square. You'd have to run 10000 flood fills, each filling the whole 10000 array, giving you 100,000,000 running time, which would not be accepted in the competition.
Feb
12
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
@phkahler, I hate to disappoint you, but flood fill IS a graph algorithm.
Feb
12
comment Help with geometry problem - don't have any idea
For the question, is one wolf enough to kill all the sheep in a yard, or can each wolf only kill one sheep?