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Jun
18
comment Haskell Input Return Tuple
I can't quite follow what you wrote, but I'll try to respond to it. You said that you don't want main to have the type IO (). Let's think about what main is. It represents your whole program, so it must be some sort of impure action; and since it's your whole program, it can't return anything useful. Thus, it must have the type IO (). And asking for it to have another type is like asking your C compiler to accept double main(char* x, void (*y)())—it's forbidden. If this isn't enough information yet, why don't you edit your question to explain what it is you're trying to do?
Jun
18
revised Haskell Input Return Tuple
Fixed capital letter typo.
Jun
18
comment Haskell Convert List to List of Tuples
Not quite: in k:v:t, k is the head, and v:t is the tail. Thus, k:v:t puts the first two items of the list into k and v and the remaining tail in t. Your code has two obvious problems: (a) (x,y) has type (String,String), not (String,Integer); and (b) there's no colon before convert xs. (You can't just do :xs, because you need [(String,Integer)] but xs has type [String].) Also, a formatting tip: indent lines with four blank spaces to get code blocks (or select your code and click the "101010" button), and surround code snippets with backticks (`...code...`).
Jun
18
revised Haskell Convert List to List of Tuples
Formatting.
Jun
18
answered Haskell Input Return Tuple
Jun
18
revised Haskell Input Return Tuple
Formatting.
Jun
18
revised In Ruby, how to write a method to display any object's instance variable names and its values
added 1196 characters in body
Jun
17
revised Defining your own Ord for a data type (Haskell)
Retag: ordinals /= ordering
Jun
17
answered Defining your own Ord for a data type (Haskell)
Jun
17
comment In Ruby, how to write a method to display any object's instance variable names and its values
That's the bare-bones simplest form, yeah. My solution also (a) recurses, so you get the tree structure, and (b) allows you to add the <br />s without rewriting the rest of your code.
Jun
17
comment what does int (*a)[10]
You don't really have a question here. What is int (*a)[10] in your code? What do you think it is—any ideas? What's the context of the code? Is there any particular reason you want to know? And just so this comment is also somewhat helpful, when trying to decipher C type declarations, cdecl is handy.
Jun
17
revised In Ruby, how to write a method to display any object's instance variable names and its values
Added an `each_variable` method and an `inspect_variables` function based on that.
Jun
17
answered In Ruby, how to write a method to display any object's instance variable names and its values
Jun
15
comment about HTML code
Your question is relatively incoherent, and it's not clear what you want to do. If you told us (a) what you were trying to do (the end goal, not just "write HTML"), and (b) what you had tried/thought about, we might be able to help.
Jun
13
revised Objective-C syntax
added 1093 characters in body
Jun
13
comment Objective-C syntax
The asterisks are important, since they denote pointers; see my edit. The class types are passed as pointers, whereas the primitives are not. This isn't the only use of pointers! You can also pass in pointers to objects if you want to modify them; for instance, many methods take an error:(NSDictionary**)err. You can't modify passed-in arguments, as they're copied, but since you can dereference a pointers, they can do something like *err = myErrInfo so that the caller can see it. There are other references which explain pointers (and probably StackOverflow questions); check them out!
Jun
13
revised Objective-C syntax
Explained pointers briefly.
Jun
13
answered Objective-C syntax
Jun
13
answered Stupid Question Regarding If-Else's Simultaneous Execution in C++ or C
Jun
13
comment Improve my Haskell implementation of Filter
Anton: Good catch. Fixed.