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Jun
18
comment Using regex to separate a multipart email
The problem isn't that regexen are evil—in fact, I actually quite like them! The problem is that there are some things that they literally cannot do, and people insist on trying anyway. For instance, any language which needs to match arbitrarily-nested balanced brackets cannot be matched by a regex; HTML is one such language, yet people still try. I don't know the precise format of email, but it may be possible to do what you're trying to do using a regex; generally, though, one recommends a parser for more complicated text-processing tasks.
Jun
18
comment Haskell Convert List to List of Tuples
The infixr 5 : statement says that : groups to the right with precedence 5. In other words, w:x:y:z is w:(x:(y:z)), not ((w:x):y):z. The 5 tells you where it falls in the precedence chain; for instance, since * comes before +, * has precedence 7 whereas + has precedence 6. What the data [] a = [] | a : [a] declaration tells you is the definition of : and []; that is, that they construct parts of lists, etc. As for formatting: just type `before your code, and ` after it. Read the editing help for more.
Jun
18
comment Haskell Convert List to List of Tuples
This is definitely more natural. The split library doesn't get enough love. It's too bad, since it's incredibly useful.
Jun
18
comment Haskell IO Passes to Another Function
I can't understand what you're asking for. It seems like this answers your question, but your type signature for maxinvest makes no sense. It can't be of any type a; it can only be of a particular type, namely IO Integer. It couldn't even be IO a, as your other functions assume that there are integers.
Jun
18
comment Haskell Input Return Tuple
I can't quite follow what you wrote, but I'll try to respond to it. You said that you don't want main to have the type IO (). Let's think about what main is. It represents your whole program, so it must be some sort of impure action; and since it's your whole program, it can't return anything useful. Thus, it must have the type IO (). And asking for it to have another type is like asking your C compiler to accept double main(char* x, void (*y)())—it's forbidden. If this isn't enough information yet, why don't you edit your question to explain what it is you're trying to do?
Jun
18
comment Haskell Convert List to List of Tuples
Not quite: in k:v:t, k is the head, and v:t is the tail. Thus, k:v:t puts the first two items of the list into k and v and the remaining tail in t. Your code has two obvious problems: (a) (x,y) has type (String,String), not (String,Integer); and (b) there's no colon before convert xs. (You can't just do :xs, because you need [(String,Integer)] but xs has type [String].) Also, a formatting tip: indent lines with four blank spaces to get code blocks (or select your code and click the "101010" button), and surround code snippets with backticks (`...code...`).
Jun
17
comment In Ruby, how to write a method to display any object's instance variable names and its values
That's the bare-bones simplest form, yeah. My solution also (a) recurses, so you get the tree structure, and (b) allows you to add the <br />s without rewriting the rest of your code.
Jun
17
comment what does int (*a)[10]
You don't really have a question here. What is int (*a)[10] in your code? What do you think it is—any ideas? What's the context of the code? Is there any particular reason you want to know? And just so this comment is also somewhat helpful, when trying to decipher C type declarations, cdecl is handy.
Jun
15
comment about HTML code
Your question is relatively incoherent, and it's not clear what you want to do. If you told us (a) what you were trying to do (the end goal, not just "write HTML"), and (b) what you had tried/thought about, we might be able to help.
Jun
13
comment Objective-C syntax
The asterisks are important, since they denote pointers; see my edit. The class types are passed as pointers, whereas the primitives are not. This isn't the only use of pointers! You can also pass in pointers to objects if you want to modify them; for instance, many methods take an error:(NSDictionary**)err. You can't modify passed-in arguments, as they're copied, but since you can dereference a pointers, they can do something like *err = myErrInfo so that the caller can see it. There are other references which explain pointers (and probably StackOverflow questions); check them out!
Jun
13
comment Improve my Haskell implementation of Filter
Anton: Good catch. Fixed.
Jun
12
comment Body Mass Index program in haskell
If you're prepending to a list, you ought to use x:, not [x] ++, to avoid constructing and then ignoring a whole extra list.
Jun
11
comment How to deal with the new line character in the Silverlight TextBox
Well said, sir :)
Jun
11
comment Improve my Haskell implementation of Filter
Norman: I think I follow that. Good call. I'm not entirely used to reasoning about laziness yet. (Also, thanks for catching the filter/filter1 mistake.)
Jun
10
comment Regex age verification
I was thinking about how to approach this algorithmically, and I completely forgot the "December 42nd" issue, much less the "June 31st" one. Damn… it's worse than I expected.
Jun
10
comment Regex age verification
Does it make it impossible? No, because you have a finite number of strings to match (assuming you restrict yourself to four-digit years), so you could (but wouldn't) build it with a gigantic | statement. Does it make it terrible to write? Yes, it really, really does. And like someone else said, note that it is impossible to use regexen to validate certain other classes of input!
Jun
10
comment Regex and PHP for extracting contents between tags with several line breaks
Parsing is the task of processing text into useful data. Regexen are only capable of parsing the regular languages, which does not include, for instance, the language of balanced brackets (where ([])() matches, but ([) does not). HTML requires the ability to do things like that (e.g., <a><b></b></a> is legal, but <a><b></a> is not), and so literally cannot be parsed with regular expressions. You had a goal: "get at the given div". However, the way you said you wanted to do it cannot possibly get you there.
Jun
10
comment Improve my Haskell implementation of Filter
luqui: Oh, definitely. But if you have something that is strict, it can be nice to have the tail-recursive version—that's why foldl' is nice, but foldl is less useful.
Jun
9
comment Regex with optional part doesn't create backreference
This won't actually work, though—see my answer. The lazy quantifier will match nothing. You can try it for yourself.
Jun
9
comment Learning C, would appreciate input on why this solution works
Out of curiosity, why the downvote? Is there something wrong with the answer, or something I ought to improve?