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Jun
4
comment Type-conditional controls in Haskell
I'm not sure what you mean by "wanted for a really long time"—they've always been around. And fundeps (and type families, as I said in my answer) don't work here, because there are two instances for e.g. Flattenable [a]: Flattenable [a] [a] and Flattenable [a] a. I couldn't figure out how to tell OverlappingInstances or something to just pick the more specific one, and so reverted to this solution. Like I said, if you know how to do that, please let me know.
Jun
4
comment putStrLn, type Char does not match [Char]
Why not be better this time? You can always go back and edit your question! (Also, +1 for taking my nitpicks with good humor :) Good luck with your Haskelling!)
Jun
4
comment putStrLn, type Char does not match [Char]
Just a couple bits of formatting advice: your code is badly formatted, and doesn't run in GHC. Try lining up each line with the line above it (so the p of putStrLn line is right below the l of line <- getS x. Also, it would be nice if you had -- Complaining line and left off the <, so that it was a legal comment and people could copy-paste your code.
Jun
4
comment How to execute multiple succeeding functions in 1 line in Ruby?
You can do it in one line as you've been shown, but I would say that the best way to write it is on multiple lines.
Jun
4
comment What, if any, is wrong with this approach to declarative I/O
Apparently (I wasn't there), the model was a pain to use for everyone and was henceforth abandoned. Also, the "Tackling the Awkward Squad" paper can be found at research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/simonpj/papers/… .
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
I understand that they're the same up to isomorphism; my point is that using id doesn't allow you to show that, it requires you to already know it. The no-argument-no-body case, on the other hand, does allow you to show it, as was just said. And Tom, I seem to have misunderstood your comment about "polymorphic identity function applied to ⊥"; disregard my comment, then, please :)
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
Camcann: And actually, that's what I meant by "not generic enough"; f x = x only functions from ⊥1 to itself, and not between any two bottom types. I see why you could instead look at it as being too generic, though, and definitely why it doesn't work.
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
Tom: That precise statement can't be true, because you're overly constraining the types involved: if we have data ⊥1 and data ⊥2, then we can't prove that ⊥1 -> ⊥2 doing that, even though we should be able to. Something like that was originally my first thought too :) Also, you'll never be able to apply the identity function to an object of type ⊥1 or ⊥2, since those values don't exist.
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
Aha, I think I get it. The version I had been entertaining was something like f x = x, which would be instantiable iff P = ⊥, but that clearly wasn't generic enough. So the idea is that to return a valueless type, you need no body; but for the function to be definable and total, you need no cases, and so if P is uninhabited, everything works out? That's a little wonky, but I think I see it. That seems to interact rather oddly with my definition of the Xor type… I'll have to think about that. Thanks!
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
I don't quite get the intuition behind representing ¬p as P -> Falsity. I understand why it works (¬p ≡ p → ⊥), but I don't get the code version. P -> ⊥ should be inhabited precisely when P is not, right? But shouldn't this function always be inhabited? Or possible never, actually, since you can't return an instance of ? I don't quite see the conditionality of it. What's the intuition here?
Jun
3
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
Apocalisp: Either a a shouldn't quite be a theorem: Either ⊥ ⊥ is still uninhabited. Tom: As camccann said, consistency implies termination. Thus, a consistent type system won't allow you to express f :: a -> b, and so the type would be uninhabited; an inconsistent type system would have an inhabitant for the type, but one that wouldn't terminate. camccann: Are there inconsistent type systems which aren't Turing-complete, occupying some in-between point on the hierarchy? Or is that last step (adding general recursion or whatever) precisely equivalent to inconsistency?
Jun
3
comment \newcommand / \newenvironment - optional parameters
I've never seen this package before—that's really cool!
Jun
2
comment Data structure name: combination array/linked list
srikfreak: The idea is that while in a linked list, you have (in C++) template <typename T> struct ll_node { T value; ll_node<T>* next; }, here you would have something like template <typename T> struct ull_node { T value[MAX]; size_t n_elements; ull_node<T>* next; }. I don't think the array elements in the "static array" case are supposed to represent literal values, but if you want, I bet you could just think of them as hexadecimal numbers instead of characters.
Jun
2
comment explain largestDivisible code from the Learn You A Haskell for Great Good tutorial
Your question is incomprehensible—I'm not sure what you're actually asking.
Jun
2
comment Properly match a Java string literal
Nitpick: it's a double quote, not an apostrophe.
Jun
1
comment regex using vb.net
Don't use a regex to parse HTML!
May
31
comment dealing with IO vs pure code in haskell
Glad I could help. Is there anything in particular you don't get? A lot of stuff towards the end is more something I think you might want to look at/learn, rather than as something I think you ought to already know.
May
31
comment regex search a mysql text column
See my edit—this should address your concern. The reason your modification didn't work is that the , was matching the [^/] clause, not the ([[:space:]]|$|[[:punct:]]) clause, which was actually intended behavior. The edit explains why that was how it was written, however.
May
31
comment scripts on Cshell
lego69: Please tag all homework questions as such.
May
31
comment scripts on Cshell
lego69: Why? DVK is right—it's an odd requirement. And their first answer seems like the best one to me (especially since Perl is just creating a temp file too.)