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Jul
16
comment C++ - Fastest possible bilinear interpolation?
Just looking at it, that inner loop begs for using pointers and unrolling, and I certainly would not count on the compiler's optimizer to figure that out. The only thing a profiler could tell you is if there is any speedup to be found elsewhere.
Jul
15
revised efficient evaluation of formula
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Jul
15
answered efficient evaluation of formula
Jul
15
revised VS2010 profiler : is it possible to profile one specific method?
added 237 characters in body
Jul
15
revised VS2010 profiler : is it possible to profile one specific method?
deleted 9 characters in body
Jul
15
revised VS2010 profiler : is it possible to profile one specific method?
added 544 characters in body
Jul
15
revised VS2010 profiler : is it possible to profile one specific method?
added 544 characters in body
Jul
15
revised VS2010 profiler : is it possible to profile one specific method?
added 662 characters in body
Jul
14
comment Is callgrind able to include kernel functions in the call graph?
Are you doing this because your objective is to make your code run faster? If that is your goal, it is of little value to get a call graph, or see into kernel functions, or count how many times they are called. Here are some reasons why. If you want to know what does work, try this.. There's also a crude video. Here's another explication that might be helpful.
Jul
13
comment How to use the profiler in c++ with raspberry pi 2
You're under a debugger, right? Every debugger has a way to display the call stack. Like if the debugger is GDB, I hit Ctrl-C to interrupt it, then "thread 1" to get to the working thread, then "bt" (backtrace) to show the call stack. (By the way, compile the code in debug mode, with optimizations disabled. Do your tuning. Then when you've got it all cleaned out, turn the optimizations back on.)
Jul
13
comment gdi32.dll calls from nvoglv64.dll
@iko79: Sorry, but it isn't. Profiling has a front end, and a back end. The front end needs to sample the stack, on a wall-clock time interrupt (not CPU-time). The back end needs to allow you, the programmer, to actually see and concentrate on a small number of those samples, not summarize a large number. Speed problems in software are not like in baseball. You're looking for large wastage requiring insight, not small percent differences requiring lots of samples. Example, 30% of time doing something unnecessary: 7 samples expose it, on average.
Jul
13
comment How to use the profiler in c++ with raspberry pi 2
Again, try the method I posted. If you want a crude video explication, look here. gprof has several deficiencies listed here.
Jul
12
comment How to use the profiler in c++ with raspberry pi 2
Give this a try.
Jul
10
revised Find the most executed section of java source code
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Jul
10
revised Find the most executed section of java source code
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Jul
10
answered Find the most executed section of java source code
Jul
10
comment gdi32.dll calls from nvoglv64.dll
As many people do, you are treating it as a process of measuring various things and puzzling out what's going on. There's a more direct way to do it.
Jul
5
comment Does argument order for the C calling convention ever have a performance impact?
Even if there is a difference, it's probably too little to matter. If you're programming an application, and you want maximum performance, don't laser-focus on tiny stuff. There's big stuff hovering outside the range of what you can guess. Find out what it is.
Jul
2
answered estimate performance gain based on application profiling (math)
Jul
1
revised How can GCC unroll a loop if its number of iterations is unknown at compile time?
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