26,718 reputation
75179
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United States
age 70
visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen 4 hours ago

BS Mechanical Engr.
PhD CS(AI)
CS Prof (4yr)
Numerous consulting jobs.
15 yr at http://www.pharsight.com
Published book on CS & several articles
4 kids, 2 grand
Pilot(student)

P.S. The picture is an Inverse-Beta distribution. It shows the program speedup factors you can get if you see a problem twice in 2, 3, 4, and 5 samples. You can derive it from Amdahl's law.


Aug
31
comment Fast, unbiased, integer pseudo random generator with arbitrary bounds
@blondiepassesby: well, it's that plus one's relying on the tool to recognize speedup opportunities, and in general that requires intelligence that the tools don't have. If you examine several stack samples, you get a gut feeling for the full reason why it's spending the time, where the tool can only give you measurements on subsets of the code. (And of course, there's the old saw about needing lots of samples. To see something big enough to worry about, a small number of samples is quite sufficient :)
Aug
31
comment Fast, unbiased, integer pseudo random generator with arbitrary bounds
@blondiepassesby: 1. I'm a bit of a nut telling people all the faults with gprof like it doesn't give you line or instruction level resolution. (I'd be surprised if perf is much better.) I would use the diagnostic method recommended in that post before I put any faith in the percents. At any rate, I would never assume there's only one thing to be fixed. If you can pick up a 30% speedup with modulo, that's great, but there could well be more. This explains why. i.e. what's the other 68% of time?
Aug
30
comment Fast, unbiased, integer pseudo random generator with arbitrary bounds
+ Especially for your last sentence.
Aug
30
comment How to find max and min bounds of a uncertain function
The Computational Science stack exchange might be a better place to ask this question.
Aug
30
comment Release build vs. Debug build performance
@Sleicreider: Code only benefits from optimization for the fraction of time that the program counter is actually in it, and that's what self time is. If 99% of the time the program counter is in memory allocation, math library, or waiting for I/O, then even if the optimizer speeds up your code infinitely, it can't save more than 1% overall.
Aug
29
comment Release build vs. Debug build performance
@Shaktal: You say when profiling you should always run with optimizations enabled. I think it depends on whether you are simply measuring performance or actively trying to find performance bugs. Those are different objectives. A performance bug is where the program is wasting clock time doing something unnecessary. You don't find it by wishing the program were fast. You find it by debugging what it is spending time on. The optimizer cannot remove things one may be doing that are unnecessary, but it can make them hard to find.
Aug
29
comment Searching and Sorting Quickly
I'm still amazed at how many people ask "I'm doing XYZ, and it's too slow. How can I make it faster?" As if other people's guesses have much of a chance. There's a Swiss-army-knife can't-lose method. Let the program itself tell you the answer. Here's a short example (in python, but you'll get the idea).
Aug
28
comment Sorting strings inside structures in c
@pmg: that should be the answer.
Aug
27
comment Can you replace floating points divisions by integer operations?
The Apollo Guidance Computer did not have floating point, in hardware or even in software. All of its vector and matrix programming was done in fixed-point arithmetic.
Aug
26
comment State Machine Designing
State machines are not a big deal. If they change very infrequently, you can make use of the fact that every state machine corresponds to a regular expression, and every regular expression corresponds to a simple structured program (with if and while).
Aug
26
comment In what way I can pinpoint the system calls and CPU instructions without debugger?
I've done it with an In-Circuit Emulator (ICE), also known as an Intel "Blue Box". I don't know any other way, short of a debugger.
Aug
25
comment Best way to iterate a dictionary in c# using foreach
@BartoszKP: They seem guessable because I pointed out what they were. They were in an app of about 10^6 LOC, 10^4 source files. There are hundreds if not thousands of things that one could guess at, which of course nobody does. On top of that, one has to assume in looking at the code that it is more or less sensible, and it certainly looks OK. If you get inclusive wall-clock time by function with a profiler, you can see functions taking time, but they look OK. It's only when you see the complete context from stack samples that you see it doesn't need to be done.
Aug
25
comment how to find the Second Largest Element using c program without using array
wasn't me - I agree. I think the downvote happened before you made your edit. BTW, shouldn't it be else if (num>m2)?
Aug
23
comment char *c=“1234”. Address stored in c is always the same
@Keith: You have to build on what students already know. They know arithmetic, so if you start with a simple model of memory as a set of numbered mailboxes, and a computer as a really stupid mailman doing what some of the numbers in the mailboxes are telling him, they get it. Then you can introduce higher-level ideas and they have a grounding. Much later you can introduce discrete mathematics like groups, rings, or lattices where a datatype is a really abstract set with operations on it, which is much easier to get if they can always relate it back to a concrete model.
Aug
23
comment char *c=“1234”. Address stored in c is always the same
@Keith: From my teaching days, I always found the basic ideas of programming much easier to get across if people can think of a pointer as a variable that contains an address, and an address is nothing but a number, that just happens to mean where something is in memory. Once they have a concrete foundation, then we can get abstract and say a pointer is really something different from a number. If I say that at the beginning, it's just confusing. They want to know what it is, not what it isn't.
Aug
23
comment char *c=“1234”. Address stored in c is always the same
@Keith: Yes I noticed, thanks. Yeah I know the behavior is undefined, but with a newbie I don't want to confuse him by splitting hairs.
Aug
22
comment Is it inefficient to highly frequently create short-lived new instances of a class?
@Servy: 1) Performance questions are often XY problems, and it may be helpful to the OP to suggest another way to look at it. 2) No matter how fast the machine is, what matters is the % of time doing each thing - creating point objects may take very few cycles, but if those are 40% of the overall time, it's worth looking at. If 10%, maybe something else should be fixed first. Again, speed of processor doesn't matter - percents matter. (BTW - Those downvotes didn't come from me - I don't like to do that. You were being very informative.)
Aug
22
comment Is it inefficient to highly frequently create short-lived new instances of a class?
@Servy: You've been on this site long enough that I'm sure you've seen this, this, and this, and the theoretical foundation here. At any rate, creating objects may be amazingly fast, but no matter how fast, it takes some fraction of overall time, and if that fraction is significant, then not doing it would save that fraction.
Aug
22
comment How to profile a program that doesn't wait for user input to run and exits quickly
Can you put a top-level loop in your program, so whatever it's supposed to do, it does it 1000 times? That won't change the percents seen by the profiler.
Aug
21
comment Execute user C# code
You want some C# code to execute the user?