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Dec
24
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
accepted How does git store the “edges” in the graph of commits?
Dec
15
accepted How to download binary file using ASP.net Web API and Javascript?
Dec
15
accepted How to use Entity Framework 6 to update many-to-many relationship?
Dec
15
accepted How to make a copy of a remote git branch (without merging with my existing branch)?
Dec
15
comment How to make a copy of a remote git branch (without merging with my existing branch)?
For example, I have a master branch, the remote has a master branch. I make my changes to the master branch and then git push origin master
Dec
15
comment How to make a copy of a remote git branch (without merging with my existing branch)?
I find that a bit confusing because I'm used to making local branches with the same name as the remote and then pushing and pulling. Is this an anti-pattern?
Dec
15
asked How to make a copy of a remote git branch (without merging with my existing branch)?
Dec
13
accepted Under what circumstances can a git commit not have exactly one parent commit?
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
@MichaelChirico, I went ahead and started a chat. I wrote some more there for you; I think you can recover your files based on what you said, you just need to follow the correct steps. Just back up what you have before you do anything else.
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
I think I may have misunderstood your question. At first, I thought that you said that your original files were lost, but you still have the .git directory, but based on your comments, I'm not sure that's the case. In any case, I would suggest that you be sure to work with a copy of your repo until you are certain that you have restored the remote to where it needs to be.
Dec
13
revised Recovering file history after a forced push
added 598 characters in body
Dec
13
comment Under what circumstances can a git commit not have exactly one parent commit?
To be clear, are the root commits and merge commits the only commits that can have other than exactly one parent?
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
For starters, please make sure you are making a copy and not messing with your original. I'm used to doing this in powershell, and when I change directory to the folder that contains the .git folder, my command prompt shows the name of the branch I was last on. git reset --hard populates the working directory with the contents of that branch, so if you placed other files in the directory, they would possibly be removed.
Dec
13
comment How does git store the “edges” in the graph of commits?
When you say the SHA1 of the parent commits, you mean the has that appears as commit xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx when you type git log?
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
No. Simply copy the .git folder into any blank directory, open a shell, change directory to that directory, and type git reset --hard. Once you're satisfied that you have recovered your files, you can do another forced push to restore the repo on the remote.
Dec
13
asked Under what circumstances can a git commit not have exactly one parent commit?
Dec
13
comment Recovering file history after a forced push
I think this should get you back in business, but it would be interesting to know if there is a solution in the case that you lost the .git folder, too.
Dec
13
answered Recovering file history after a forced push