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Sep
13
comment Scala MouseEvent - How to know which button was pressed?
You have to access them via the class, not via the instance: if (e.peer.getButton == java.awt.event.MouseEvent.BUTTON1), as an example.
Sep
13
answered Scala MouseEvent - How to know which button was pressed?
Sep
10
revised C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
added 2204 characters in body
Sep
10
comment C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
@jifuyo - Fair enough - if you're allowing two-pass methods, you need at least O(K*B) memory to store the bin boundaries, where K is the length of the string and B is the size of the allowable character set. Still more than quicksort's O(log N) in most cases, but pretty insignificant compared to the strings themselves.
Sep
10
comment C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
@jifuyo - They're not sorted, and you don't know how many there are. So you need to create a resizable array or a tree to hold your pointers, and then you have to bucket again recursively. This gives you O(N log N) performance and considerable memory usage even if you're really careful, since you need to generate buckets any time you have confused strings. And then, don't forget that you have to weigh a string compare and pointer manipulation against a char index lookup and creation and maintenance of an array of stored values.
Sep
10
comment C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
@jifuyo - Do you have any reason to suspect you might hit a worst-case scenario? And if so, why not just use mergesort? And how do you intend to not need to look at every character in a string to separate two strings different only in the last character? In radix sort, you have to look at the whole thing to put each in the right bucket; in mergesort you have to run to the end to do that comparison.
Sep
10
comment C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
@Eric - String comparisons are built out of char comparisons. What is your point?
Sep
10
answered C# radix sort for strings of arbitrary lengths
Sep
10
answered Does extending a class in scala with constructor params add vals (fields) to the class?
Sep
9
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
9
comment What is the most succinct Scala way to reverse a Map?
@Rodney - Okay, okay, I'll show the overlap case!
Sep
9
revised What is the most succinct Scala way to reverse a Map?
added 476 characters in body; added 34 characters in body
Sep
9
revised What is the most succinct Scala way to reverse a Map?
added 272 characters in body
Sep
9
answered What is the most succinct Scala way to reverse a Map?
Sep
9
answered Calling Java from Scala: protected constructor
Sep
8
comment Constraint Satisfaction: Choosing real numbers with certain characteristics
@Paul - Mathematical smoothness doesn't help much. Do you know something about the first partial derivatives, and bounds on the magnitude of higher derivatives? That could help.
Sep
8
answered Constraint Satisfaction: Choosing real numbers with certain characteristics
Sep
8
comment Greatest GCD between some numbers
Actually, since GCD generally takes log(M) time, I guess the second step has complexity O(N*M) instead of O(N*N*log(M)), so it is a good strategy when M/log(M) < N.
Sep
8
comment Greatest GCD between some numbers
@Ishtar - Unfortunately, no obvious assumption will let you do better than looking at every GCD. There are some not-entirely-unreasonable assumptions that may let you do better (e.g. that the maximum size of a number in the list, M, is no larger than, say, N^(3/2) on average), but those assumptions weren't stated. For a general algorithm, where lists are non-gigantic and the size of the numbers is in general way bigger than the list length, my example holds.