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Jun
12
comment Conversion from Function to sets of custom types
@RégisJean-Gilles - Because in general you don't want them jumping around without knowing about it, as Mii is unboxed while Mxy is boxed and the only reason to use Mii normally is for performance. Otherwise it's what I'd do, though--good idea in general.
Jun
12
comment Conversion from Function to sets of custom types
@AkosKrivachy - Unfortunately, I can't change muse, nor does the actual case I care about admit wrapping with outer methods (because there are far too many methods like muse).
Jun
11
asked Conversion from Function to sets of custom types
Jun
11
answered Call Scala generic method from Java
Jun
11
comment Java interoperability woes with Scala generics and boxing
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jun
11
comment Pattern Matching Array of Bytes
match { case (X, y) => ??? } will pick out a tuple whose first element matches the pre-existing value of X, and bind the second element to y. In general, if the first letter is a capital, the name is considered to be something to test against, while if it is lower case, it's a new variable name to bind the value to.
Jun
10
comment Pattern Matching Array of Bytes
You're forgetting the upper/lower case thing. It's not extracting data in this case.
Jun
10
answered Pattern Matching Array of Bytes
Jun
10
comment Java interoperability woes with Scala generics and boxing
@Orubel - You make no distinction between what I agree with and what I don't agree with in what you say (you've done it again), which makes it pointless to "discuss" further.
Jun
10
comment Java interoperability woes with Scala generics and boxing
@Orubel - On my post dated "Jun 5 at 19:35", I link to a severe Groovy performance problem that turns out to have been caused by innocently assuming that "/ 2" means the same thing that it does in Java. Also, my point all along has been that Scala isn't promising to be fully interoperable; you were the one that flat-out stated that some case of non-interoperability was a bug (rather than a consequence of design choices).
Jun
10
comment C - What does int *p; p=15; does?
@EugeneSh. - Yes, but the OP wanted to know why their code did what it did, which my answer explains. Just because it's undefined by some standard doesn't mean you cannot understand why it does what it does in your case.
Jun
10
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
9
answered C - What does int *p; p=15; does?
Jun
9
answered scala two options defined, return first, else return second
Jun
9
answered Using getOrElseUpdate of TrieMap in Scala
Jun
9
comment Scala way to transform an array of points
@Chris - Millions of points still isn't very many; a single machine can handle that. But if you are performance-limited, switch to arrays which hold each index separately (or hold them in even-odd pairs) and you will speed your code up by a factor of 20. Write a recursive function or a while loop to process them.
Jun
8
answered Scala way to transform an array of points
Jun
8
comment Java interoperability woes with Scala generics and boxing
@Orubel - You already ignored the division problem. I could bring up others, but why, if you're just going to ignore it and reiterate your first point? And you continue to make claims without supporting evidence. "Groovy is as fast as Java." Still no benchmarks. "People use Groovy over Scala." Some do, sure--different people prefer different tradeoffs. But did you check the number of questions about Scala and Groovy on SO, or ranking on TIOBE, or anything? You cannot have sound argumentation with flawed premises.
Jun
7
comment Java interoperability woes with Scala generics and boxing
@Orubel - I am glad you're happy with Groovy, and you are fortunate to not need to actually care whether Groovy is really as fast as Java, so you can rely upon warm fuzzy feelings instead of benchmarks.
Jun
7
comment Scala: How to compute the sum of all elements in the leaves of a Binary Tree?
Why are you returning a MutableList when you want an Int? You don't gain anything from doing the sum later; just do it right there.