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seen Sep 2 '10 at 17:20

Feb
3
answered Why this Dijkstra (graph) implementation isn't working?
Feb
2
comment Select mutex or dummy mutex at runtime
Add a try_lock() method and it will conform to the Lockable concept for use with the unique_lock class. See: boost.org/doc/libs/1_41_0/doc/html/thread/…
Jan
29
awarded  Commentator
Jan
29
comment C++ pointer help
p.s., notice how this will match the delete pattern in the deallocate() function. A good rule of thumb is to count your new calls and your delete calls; they should be the same.
Jan
29
answered C++ pointer help
Jan
16
comment Passing a const vector<pointers> to a method but changing value pointed to
@Prasoon: Correct. My intent was to focus on the str pointer usage and not necessarily the string literals themselves. I've updated the examples to avoid confusion.
Jan
16
revised Passing a const vector<pointers> to a method but changing value pointed to
Corrected example
Jan
16
answered Passing a const vector<pointers> to a method but changing value pointed to
Jan
15
comment Pointer to a class and function - problem
I think I now know what you are asking for. Let me restate the problem: with your current code, it always calls class B's call() method, even if the something pointer (B*) is pointing to a C object. And what you really want is for callSomething() to call B's call() if something is pointing to a B object, C's call() if it is pointing to a C object, etc. Solution: mark the call() method virtual in the base class (B), i.e. "virtual void call() { ... }", and something->call() will dispatch to C's call() method (if something is pointing to a C object).
Jan
14
comment Pointer to a class and function - problem
Do you only ever want to call B's version of the call() method for all instances of a B pointer (whether it's a B, C, D, E, or F)? Or do you just not want to call C's call() method if something is a C object? And is this special behavior only desired for A's call from callSomething(), or all calls to the call() method?
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
comment Checking if an iterator is valid
After seeing your new code example, note that STL erase methods return the next iterator, which is a valid iterator (though it may be the end iterator). Therefore, to help keep itd valid, you could do this: if (something) { itd = l.erase(itd); }
Jan
14
answered Checking if an iterator is valid
Jan
14
comment C++ - Deleting a vector element that is referenced by a pointer
@Potatoswatter: With a graph data structure, you often want a master list of nodes (e.g., the pieces vector). This is especially true if you cannot reference the complete graph from a single starting node (e.g., consider a graph consisting of multiple, unconnected subgraphs).
Jan
14
comment C++ - Deleting a vector element that is referenced by a pointer
@sth: You are correct that it is an implementation detail. However, it is most likely that vectors are implemented as arrays and that their iterators are pointers. "Effective STL: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your Use of the Standard Template Library" by Scott Meyers discusses how to pass vector data to a legacy (pointer-based) API, and he recommends &v[0] to get the pointer. Therefore, even if the iterator is not a pointer, you could at least use "mother - &pieces[0]" to get the index for erasure. However, both of these are techniques are something I'd avoid anyway ;)
Jan
14
answered Pointer to a class and function - problem
Jan
14
comment C++ - Deleting a vector element that is referenced by a pointer
The problem is more severe than dangling pointers (i.e., other pieces that may have the same mother) that need to be updated. The shifting of the other pieces in the vector when the mother is erased may affect other pieces with different mothers.
Jan
14
comment C++ - Deleting a vector element that is referenced by a pointer
Actually, you can directly erase the element from the vector with "pieces.erase(the_piece.mother);" because the pointer is the same as the vector iterator to that piece. The main problem (invalidation) still exists, though, as pieces shift position in the vector.
Jan
14
answered C++ - Deleting a vector element that is referenced by a pointer
Jan
13
awarded  Editor