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Apr
8
awarded  Great Answer
Oct
3
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
awarded  Yearling
Jul
30
awarded  Civic Duty
Nov
15
awarded  Yearling
Mar
28
revised Fortran: How do I read the first character from each line of a text file?
Wolfram Alpha is getting dumber. Trivial change of "term" to "number" to fix non-working link query.
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Sep
29
awarded  Yearling
Sep
26
revised Fortran: How do I read the first character from each line of a text file?
Wolfram Alpha got dumber somehow: I had to change "1476th" to "1476" in the search query to get the answer this time.
Aug
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
22
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
22
comment Getting started with a new code in an unfamiliar language
I vouch for PlusFORT and FORCHECK. They are handy tools. Be sure to check the documentation for your compiler too: Sometimes the compilers have nifty reporting features.
Nov
2
answered Fortran: How do I read the first character from each line of a text file?
Oct
4
awarded  Yearling
May
7
answered Can Vim do Fortran completion of subroutine arguments
May
5
comment how do you iterate through an array in fortran?
The Fortran 90 part is in the array support for lbound and ubound. What's even more cool is if you can grok some of the "whole array" functionality, you can do one-liners a la the legendary APL.
May
1
comment What does the period do in this line of Fortran?
INTEGERs are coerced into reals when multiplied/divided w.r.t. a REAL value, so this decimal point is superfluous. However, when you see such care taken as in the example it's a good bet that E, F & G were all declared REAL and the 4. (== 4.0) was used to avoid a "mixed type" warning from the compiler or code checker. Language lawyers know all about coercion rules, but corporate programmers (me, once) just remember that you need to keep REALs with REALs and INTEGERs with INTEGERs to get past code review.
Mar
2
comment How can I compare a number against a range in bash or Perl?
@ysth, I believe that if you had "$x = 5;" perl should keep it as an integer if possible, but if you had "$x = (1 / 2) * 10;" I would hope it would be kept as a float. Unless the problem domain is specifically restricted to integers, the floating point issue merits at least a consideration.
Feb
28
comment How can I compare a number against a range in bash or Perl?
Um ... I think some sigils are missing. Perl probably does the right thing but you might also want to keep in mind that perl uses floating point as default for numbers, so you have the potential for the 0.999999... == 1.0 problem. But I'm an old Fortran programmer, so discount my words accordingly.
Dec
12
comment Shell script numbering lines in a file
Love the Unix tools attempt at an answer in a scripting question. There is also "cat -n" as a less polished nl. And for the reflective student of sed, the following can be modified to get the exact answer desired: gnu.org/software/sed/manual/sed.html#cat-_002dn