7,762 reputation
22344
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen yesterday

Jul
8
comment Why can't my subclass access a protected variable of its superclass, when it's in a different package?
@EJP In the OP's case, the access mRelLeft.mStructure fails not because he's accessing it from a different instance than mRelLeft, but rather because the compile-time type of mRelLeft (Relation) is less derived than the class he's accessing it from (Join). If mRelLeft had a compile-time type of Join, or a compile-time type that was more derived than Join, the access would succeed. (But as Levar Burton would say, "Don't take my word for it", it's easy enough to try it and see.)
Jul
8
comment Why can't my subclass access a protected variable of its superclass, when it's in a different package?
@EJP Section 6.6.2.1 addresses access by a qualified name, e.g. Q.Id, and says "access is permitted [within S] if and only if the type of the expression Q is S or a subclass of S." So clearly one instance can access a protected member on a different instance, so long as it's of the right type.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
30
awarded  Revival
Jun
19
awarded  Nice Answer
May
16
comment Comments not working in hive CLI
Generally this is true, but I've found you can't do --comment[linebreak]SET hivevar:foo=bar; in the CLI (I guess because SET needs to be the start of a statement). In that case I had to either remove the comment or live with the error from including the semi-colon --comment;[linebreak]SET hivevar:foo=bar; (which as javadba points out, is actually a harmless -- if annoying -- error)
May
14
comment C# copy array of structs to array of doubles
@UlugbekUmirov That will still iterate through them one-by-one, though. He's trying to copy a whole block at once.
May
11
awarded  Guru
Apr
21
comment Why does the value returned should be on the same line as the return statement in JavaScript?
return is a bit of a different case, since it's a restricted production -- which doesn't apply to foo = 1
Apr
21
comment Why does the value returned should be on the same line as the return statement in JavaScript?
@BoltClock I think it's more the other way round... according to the spec semi-colons are inserted when an illegal token is encountered. So if it were illegal to follow foo with =, then a semi-colon would be inserted. E.g., I think a semi-colon would probably be inserted in the case of var <newline> =, even thought the resulting program would still be invalid.
Apr
21
comment Why does the value returned should be on the same line as the return statement in JavaScript?
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/2846283/…
Apr
21
comment Why does the value returned should be on the same line as the return statement in JavaScript?
+1 for illustrating the rationale behind making return a restricted production. I knew it was one, but had only ever seen examples where this gives the wrong behavior.
Apr
21
answered Why does the value returned should be on the same line as the return statement in JavaScript?
Apr
14
accepted What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
My god, this answer looks horrendous on a Windows phone. (The table wraps around instead of scrolling to the right, totally breaking the column alignment.)
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
@Servy OK, I see the distinction you're drawing. The thing is, if I had stopped after I'd read the initial pages I read, I would have included lots of details of the form "This site says X, which I interpret to mean XYZ, but that can't be right because it disagrees with observed behavior W..." But because I persisted until I was actually able to answer my question, it no longer seemed useful to include the things I initially found confusing or misunderstood.
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
@Servy Well, this page is now the top Google result for "Scala vs C# access modifiers" (maybe just because of recent activity, I don't know) and explains it in a way that makes sense to me, so maybe it'll save time for someone else coming from a similar background. But like I said, I don't mind the downvote, I just objected to the "lack of research" accusation. I guess you feel like it was a trivial amount of research, and only seemed substantial enough to warrant a question/answer because I was stupidly not understanding it right away. Ah well, sorry to waste your time then.
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
@Servy I'm fine with the downvote if you don't personally find it useful relative to the Google results. I'm just a bit bothered that you seem to be rather angrily declaring I "cannot so much as bother to throw [my] question into a search engine" when that was simply not true. I both read multiple search results and tested code, and I thought that posting my findings might spare someone else the trouble. (Obviously not thinking of experts with 80k stack overflow rep, here.)
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
@Servy Do you think I'm lying when I say I Googled it? My "rambling on" described what I read, and why I didn't have a full understanding from just the top result for each of "[C#/Java/Scala] access modifiers", and why I felt an explanation aimed more at people with a C# background would be useful.
Apr
9
comment What are the equivalents of C#'s access modifiers in Java and Scala?
Seriously, what part of me saying "These are some of the specific pages I read, and the details I felt they didn't make clear" makes you conclude I read nothing? If you really want to say "No question that can be answered by 3 Google searches should be posted on Stack Overflow, fine, I disagree but that's a valid opinion. (I also disagree that this question can be answered by 3 google searches, but maybe your google-fu is stronger than mine.) If you want to say I did no research, that is factually inaccurate.