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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 870 votes cast
May
7
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
@jalf Questions like "why does <random piece of code with no context> crash" deserve to be downvoted. The only valid answer for such questions is "your debugger will tell you". [Also, I've run into some weird codegen stuff with MSVC+SSE: I don't exclude a compiler bug.]
May
7
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
Debug menu -> Windows -> Disassembly (or just ALT+8 while in debugger).
May
4
comment Use std::random_shuffle with std::array
@DeadMG It's "wrong" if you need babysitting, in which case you shouldn't be using C++ anyway. In any case it's far better than getting memory through malloc and using placement new.
May
3
comment Use std::random_shuffle with std::array
Why are you doing it so complicated? Just use new[].
Apr
28
comment add 1 to c++ bitset
@wirate I have pointed you somewhere: search for bitwise operators. For example: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation or cprogramming.com/tutorial/bitwise_operators.html
Apr
28
comment add 1 to c++ bitset
No, you won't have to convert it back to bitset to retrieve individual bits -- learn how to use bitwise operators. 00010 is the same as 10; it's only up to you how many leading zeros of an integer you want to extract.
Apr
28
answered add 1 to c++ bitset
Apr
25
revised What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
added 326 characters in body
Apr
25
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@DeadMG The signature reflects that the algorithm is as generic as possible while still adhering to the underlying machine model for which it is designed and coded. If it were simple to get the pointer (not the iterator) to the last element of the vector, the interface would have taken a pair of pointers. But I deem that v.size() is nicer from the end-user perspective than &v[v.size()], and the latter will most probably trigger a debug assert. And length is int as unsigned sizes used in STL interfaces are a pile of crap.
Apr
24
answered How much is the cost of interrupt in x86_64
Apr
23
comment How much is the cost of interrupt in x86_64
Kernels generally forbid use of anything but integer instructions. Also, they are also generally (Linux and Win, at least) mapped into the process's address space, only protected from access.
Apr
23
reviewed Reject How much is the cost of interrupt in x86_64
Apr
23
answered How fast is memcpy on x86_64
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@ildjarn All well and fine, but comments with no relevance whatsoever to the actual question are not "helping", so you should be prepared to get some hostility back.
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
Marked as answer since you've made me aware of tuple_cat, which wasn't listed in MSDN for VS2010. But how would you declare the return value of a function that returns tuple_cat(x,y) for some tuples x and y whose types are not easily deducible from function arguments?
Apr
22
accepted What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
possible duplicate of Boost::Tuples vs Structs for return values
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@NicolBolas I don't agree that it's a "list question", but I'm going to vote to close it as the "Related" links show an almost exact duplicate. [Funnily, it wasn't shown while I was preparing the question.]
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@ildjarn 1) Passing std::vector would prevent the function from working with plain arrays. 2) The question was about use-cases for tuples in C++, not soliciting comments about coding style.
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@JohnZwinck "Interoperate" means to me being to call functions in other languages without writing glue layers. So that encompasses C, C++, and Fortran, which I have forgotten. But I agree it's nice to have tuples which allow to more closely mirror the "other language's" API.