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bio website zvrba.net
location Oslo, Norway
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visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen Jan 16 '13 at 16:31

Aug
9
comment Is there a static analyzer can check local variables re-assignment in C/C++/Objective-C?
By not declaring local variables as const, you have to run a separate tool. Isn't that more annoying than explicitly writing "const" and letting the compiler check it?
Jun
10
comment Should arrays be used in C++?
@Nils arrays guarantee alignment too. Plus, automatic storage allocation ("the stack") is way faster than dynamic storage allocation. If I know I have exactly 3 elements [e.g., coordinates of a triangle], there's no reason to use vector.
Jun
10
comment Should arrays be used in C++?
std::array is a template, which impacts large projects in terms of build time and possibly code size since for each combination of T,N the template is instantiated anew.
May
16
comment mupdf and freetype: why are fonts blurred?
say what? antialiasing IS blurring!
May
14
comment Objects in C language
Well there, I was deliberately imprecise in order to avoid self-referential explanation like yours.
May
9
comment testing for double in visual c++
@IanGoldby Yeah. In any case, it was unclear from the question whether trailing garbage was allowed or not. In the simplest case, I would just check whether *endptr==0.
May
9
comment testing for double in visual c++
@IanGoldby I suggested (maybe not explicitly enough) that the location of where conversion stopped should be used to decide whether it also succeeeded. Also, it (conveniently) discards leading whitespace.
May
9
comment “Floating-point invalid operation” when inputting float to a stringstream
Have you tried using printf() instead of cout?
May
8
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
@jalf Except it wasn't acces violation due to null pointer exception, and he knew that variables had to be 16-byte aligned as witnessed by the question. With a bit of debugging he would have been able to deduce what happens on unaligned loads, even if he originally didn't know (aha! that's what happens when I don't do what CPU demands). And the question is incomplete because relevant information (declarations of variables involved) is missing.
May
7
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
@jalf The question, which is only answerable by a debugger (as in this case -- the code is apparently correct; simple inspection in a debugger would reveal misalignment; but this also includes compiler bugs) should be closed as too localized, yes. Plus, there is no evidence in the question that assumptions (about arguments been properly aligned) have been verified. Definitely downvote or close.
May
7
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
@jalf Questions like "why does <random piece of code with no context> crash" deserve to be downvoted. The only valid answer for such questions is "your debugger will tell you". [Also, I've run into some weird codegen stuff with MSVC+SSE: I don't exclude a compiler bug.]
May
7
comment Cannot access memory as SSE type on x86 but works fine on x64
Debug menu -> Windows -> Disassembly (or just ALT+8 while in debugger).
May
4
comment Use std::random_shuffle with std::array
@DeadMG It's "wrong" if you need babysitting, in which case you shouldn't be using C++ anyway. In any case it's far better than getting memory through malloc and using placement new.
May
3
comment Use std::random_shuffle with std::array
Why are you doing it so complicated? Just use new[].
Apr
28
comment add 1 to c++ bitset
@wirate I have pointed you somewhere: search for bitwise operators. For example: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation or cprogramming.com/tutorial/bitwise_operators.html
Apr
28
comment add 1 to c++ bitset
No, you won't have to convert it back to bitset to retrieve individual bits -- learn how to use bitwise operators. 00010 is the same as 10; it's only up to you how many leading zeros of an integer you want to extract.
Apr
25
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@DeadMG The signature reflects that the algorithm is as generic as possible while still adhering to the underlying machine model for which it is designed and coded. If it were simple to get the pointer (not the iterator) to the last element of the vector, the interface would have taken a pair of pointers. But I deem that v.size() is nicer from the end-user perspective than &v[v.size()], and the latter will most probably trigger a debug assert. And length is int as unsigned sizes used in STL interfaces are a pile of crap.
Apr
23
comment How much is the cost of interrupt in x86_64
Kernels generally forbid use of anything but integer instructions. Also, they are also generally (Linux and Win, at least) mapped into the process's address space, only protected from access.
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
@ildjarn All well and fine, but comments with no relevance whatsoever to the actual question are not "helping", so you should be prepared to get some hostility back.
Apr
22
comment What are good use-cases for tuples in C++11?
Marked as answer since you've made me aware of tuple_cat, which wasn't listed in MSDN for VS2010. But how would you declare the return value of a function that returns tuple_cat(x,y) for some tuples x and y whose types are not easily deducible from function arguments?