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Sep
3
comment Drawing Sphere in OpenGL without using gluSphere()?
Maybe a better way to explain the "normalization" process here is that the points are being projected onto a sphere. Also, note that the results differ depending on whether the normalization/projection is applied just once at the end (after all subdivision, which seems to be what is being suggested here) or interleaved with the (recursive) subdivision steps. It appears that projecting just once at the end yields vertices clustered near the vertices of the initial octahedron, whereas interleaved subdivision and projection yields uniform distances between vertices.
Sep
7
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
21
suggested suggested edit on What is a good random number generator for a game?
Feb
14
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Also, to summarize the answers below, it seems that there are two potential problems with constantly calling reset() (or recreating the distribution) before generating each sample: 1) it might decrease efficiency because any cached values within the distribution are lost, and 2) (even more serious, if true) it might produce an incorrect distribution.
Feb
14
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
It seems that there are two use cases here: 1) binding an engine and distribution (the intended use), and 2) using multiple engines with one distribution (what I am doing here). I suppose I prefer to think of the distributions as simple stateless functions: you give them an engine, and they return a sample. But I understand the need to treat them as objects so they can cache values for efficiency. It would have been nice if the standard provided, for each distribution, both a stateless function to get just one sample, and an object for generating/caching several samples.
Feb
14
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
@SteveJessop: Yes, I was implying that this may be a defect in the standard. Regarding the libc++ implementation of normal_distribution::operator() (llvm.org/svn/llvm-project/libcxx/trunk/include/random), fortunately, it looks like it always uses the supplied parameters (probably the intent of the standard, as you said). However, it will sometimes use the supplied generator and sometimes use a cached value based on the previously supplied generator (possibly not the intent of the standard). So d(g) is, in your words, basically useless. But d(g,p) is only half useless.
Feb
14
awarded  Yearling
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Another example: the sample implementation of std::random_shuffle here en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/random_shuffle (2nd version) may be invalid because, again, the same distribution is reused with different parameters.
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
I was thinking about this a bit more... Say we have just one generator instance g, a std::bernoulli_distribution b, and two different bernoulli parameters p1 and p2. If I call b(g,p1) followed by b(g,p2), both samples may use p1 and ignore p2, and nothing in the standard prevents that. Again, not what I expected.
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
I think I'll change my overall strategy after reading the responses: I'll either bind my generator and distribution (which seems to be the intended usage, rather than allowing multiple generators to use the same distribution object), or I may just use the std lib's generators but ignore the distribution functions (after finding out that the distributions are not necessarily portable: stackoverflow.com/questions/14840901/…, so, even with the same seed, I may get different sequences of e.g. normal distribution samples on different platforms).
Feb
13
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Feb
13
awarded  Scholar
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Thanks for the very helpful answers and comments everyone!
Feb
13
accepted Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Ok, that's very helpful (and confusing!) Furthermore, for the operator(gen, params) version, the standard specifies behavior only for "successive invocations with the same objects g and p." So if I have two generators (gen1 and gen2) and two sets of normal params (p1 and p2), and I call normdist(gen1, p1) followed by normdist(gen2, p2), the second call may depend on gen1 and p1 and not gen2 and p2 at all. Not what I expected!
Feb
13
comment Should I keep the random distribution object instance or can I always recreate it?
See this discussion: stackoverflow.com/a/14858040/259795, where it is suggested that constantly resetting a distribution object (similar to recreating it) could potentially affect the distribution of the generated numbers, depending on how it is implemented.
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
@HowardHinnant: so do you see a potential problem with this use case as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/8433421/… where, rather than constantly calling reset, the distribution object is constantly recreated?
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Are you sure it will affect the distribution and not just the efficiency (see @HowardHinnant's answer)? I'm not sure that your srand() analogy is correct (but correct me if I'm wrong). It seems to me that the distribution's internal state should only be used to improve efficiency, but resetting it should not affect the distribution (like resetting the seed would).
Feb
13
comment Should I call reset() on my C++ std random distribution to clear hidden state?
Whoa, so what if I have two generator instances, gen1 and gen2, and a std::normal_distribution instance normdist, and I call normdist(gen1) followed by normdist(gen2). Then the second call will depend on gen1 and not gen2? Is that true?
Feb
13
awarded  Student