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Mar
11
comment Fortran: How to plug memory leak from un-deallocated pointer in linked list
@VladimirF, I played around with final procedures before, expecting the same behavior as a destructor method in C++, but experienced the behavior talked about here. The final procedure would be called as soon as the derived type was used, and the only way I could get the program to behave as I desired was to manually call a subroutine to free the object.
Mar
11
comment Fortran: How to plug memory leak from un-deallocated pointer in linked list
And @VladimirF, by removing the nullify()s from the code, does this not leave N%Parent%Child or N%Child%Parent in an undefined pointer state? Since my goal was not to nullify N, but to make sure that the nodes that once pointed to N have such pointers put into a correct state.
Mar
11
comment Fortran: How to plug memory leak from un-deallocated pointer in linked list
Thanks so much for the fast and correct answer @VladimirF! But I'm confused. N%Child%Parent is a pointer of type c_Node that is a member of the node pointed to by N%Child. I get that N%Child%Parent is actually pointing at N, but shouldn't the nullify() be acting to disassociate the Parent pointer of the node pointed to by N%Child, rather then finding it's way back to N and nullifying N? That is to say if A points to B and both A and B are pointers, then nullifying A should not also nullify B right?
Mar
10
accepted Fortran: How to plug memory leak from un-deallocated pointer in linked list
Mar
10
asked Fortran: How to plug memory leak from un-deallocated pointer in linked list
Feb
24
comment How to write Fortan Output as CSV file?
Yup... Writing reals as integers not a good idea...
Feb
24
awarded  Commentator
Feb
24
comment How to write Fortan Output as CSV file?
I'm trying '(3(i5,","),3(f15.2,","),2(i5,","))' to write a line such as 38,124,1,1,9410.000000,11250.000000,1,1 but I'm getting an error 5006 (for gfortran, that's bad format specifier). What am I doing wrong? I just realized it's probably because I'm trying to write real values as integers (even though they are actually integers)
Feb
3
revised ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
Fixed an English mistake in the first line of the question.
Jan
30
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
28
revised ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
updated the fortran example code to follow standard
Jan
27
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
I like the suggestion about assuming the format and number of characters of the ASCII input, but as this program changes versions the formatting might change (as it has in the past) so I'd like to avoid any formatting assumptions.
Jan
27
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
Thanks for the answer @TonyD. Could you provide a short example for the boost solution? Next, are you suggesting to combine the reserve() solution with the reference creation solution? And (pardon my ignorance) why would using a reference to charge[i][j] and v.emplace_back() be better than charge[i][j].emplace_back()?. Lastly, I'm skeptical about using an empty vector and reserve()ing at the tops of each loop. I have another program that came to a grinding halt using that method, and replacing the reserve()s with a preallocated multidimensional vector sped it up a lot.
Jan
23
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
I'll certainly let them know @Azrael3000 :)
Jan
22
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
Certainly @VladimirF. Unfortunately, this code is for importing output files from a chemistry simulation program that is meant to be human-readable and has no binary counterpart. I have a C++ importer for data from another simulation package that outputs binary files, and the import process is just blindingly fast.
Jan
22
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
Wow @VladimirF, I love how much of the work Fortran can just do for you. Comparing read(11,*) charge to the still-slower char array C++ code in the question makes it even more impressive. Wish I'd learned Fortran before C++, then I'd probably think that C++ was the weird one!
Jan
22
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
I'll definitely consider calling the Fortran from C++ @AlexanderVogt, and they will be necessary for many future projects of mine, but I'm also interested in learning how to get maximum speed from C++.
Jan
22
comment ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
I didn't actually write the Fortran code @VladimirF, but thanks for the correction! I actually am learning Fortran now so I appreciate the usage tips. Does the second usage know somehow how much to read in because charge is already allocated so its shape is known?
Jan
22
asked ASCII data import: how can I match Fortran's bulk read performance in C++?
Oct
29
awarded  Supporter