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Dec
4
comment 1==(int)0.5*2 => false, 1==((int)0.5*2) => true, why?
I understand how the expressions get evaluated, my question is why the extra set of parentheses in 1==((int)0.5*2) causes a difference in the evaluation.
Dec
4
comment How are java interfaces implemented internally? (vtables?)
The oracle wiki has been frozen, I think wiki.openjdk.java.net/display/HotSpot/Main is where the updateable information ended up.
Jul
8
comment How to escape os.system() calls in Python?
Note that you should use '\\"', '\\$' and '\`', otherwise the escaping doesn't happen.
Apr
15
comment how to download a large binary file with RCurl *after* server authentication
This solution requires a compiler to be installed. That's usually the case on linux and mac, but not on windows. So you will probably need to manually install a C compiler (and maybe tell R where to find it).
Mar
11
comment How to detect integer overflow in C/C++?
While converting to floating point and back works, it is (according to my testing on a 32bit machine) much slower than the other solutions.
Jul
23
comment Embed git hash into python file when installing
@Droogans I know that part, now how do I get to run it at the right time?
Jul
23
comment Embed git hash into python file when installing
@SamStudio8: Not a duplicate, that question asks about how to get the hash at commit time. I want to do it when I build a package, so I'm asking about a hook in the setup.py machinery.
May
27
comment Is a lock (wait) free doubly linked list possible?
The Valois paper uses reference counting to ensure lock free memory management. The reference count represents the number of global pointers to the node. Additionally each thread keeps a hazard list of pointers to nodes it is currently using. If a thread wants to remove a pointer from its hazard list which has a reference count of 0, it has to scan the hazard lists of all other threads to see if anyone is still using it, and only delete it of no one is. There are some tricks involved in safely scanning the hazard lists without taking any locks.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
@rodrigo: for other readers: the absolute value clang generates is 0x100000001, so it initializes both fields of the QSize. (That confused me when first reading your comment.)
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
I didn't say it was stupid, I was wondering if it was stupid or brilliant.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
I didn't know the part about the no 64 bit move immediate, so that is probably the solution. Additionally, there appears to be no real cost on x86 if an unaligned memory access does not cross cache line boundaries
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
Yes, compilers are generally able to do these kind of optimizations. It's known as constant folding.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
user315052: yes. @David Rodríguez: Shipped release code on Ubuntu is normally compiled with optimizations. I can tell from the code I've stepped through a bit that it was optimized. Some functions are inlined which GCC only does at optimization level 2.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
@Mysticial $rbx is 8 byte aligned. So the load/store is not. But it is still within a single cache line, don't know if that matters.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
@microtherion: Ah, that may be it. I missed that it was a 64 bit load/store. I guess that makes some sense as it is shorter.
May
21
comment Why would a compiler generate this assembly?
@user315052 QSize is an object with two int data members that are initialized to -1. It does not have a copy constructor (other than the compiler-generated one). But that should not matter, by generating this code the compiler shows it already knows that nothing else is going on except for moving some data around.
Feb
4
comment What C++11 <atomic> operations/memory orders guarantees freshness?
@UmNyobe The reason I didn't find that question before asking mine is that it appears to be about volatiles. The answer is a duplicate, but the question is imo not as this one will be found by people looking for something different than the "atomic and volatile" question you mention.
Jul
10
comment Is PHP flock safe in multithreaded mode on linux?
@DaveRandom: hmm, that's one way to find out, but ubuntu doesn't support thread-safe php so I'll have to compile everything myself. This is for an open source project, so I would like to make it compatible with as many setups as possible. I was hoping someone on SO already knows and tells me.
Jul
10
comment How is PHP's mt_rand seeded?
@NikiC: There are quite a number of applications where crypto-safe randomness is needed (where by crypto-safe I mean an attacker won't be able to predict the values), such as generating a session ID or a CSRF token. Salt generation is, indeed, not one of them.
Jul
10
comment How is PHP's mt_rand seeded?
@Jon: It's apparently a good idea to seed an MT with an LCG to improve the distribution of generated numbers. However, for cryptographic purposes this doesn't supply any additional entropy. If an attacker knows the PID and timestamp, he can just as easily predict the generated random numbers.