Reputation
985
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
3 7
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~16k people reached

Jan
29
answered Is there a maximum amount of data that can be read during a Fortran namelist read?
Dec
21
comment Intel Fortran on Visual Studio 2013 64 bit debugging
There's also a workaround posted in software.intel.com/en-us/forums/…
Dec
21
comment Intel Fortran on Visual Studio 2013 64 bit debugging
software.intel.com/en-us/forums/…
Aug
23
answered Fortran interface to itself produces annoying error
Aug
13
answered How to link a .LIB in a MS Visual Studio / Intel Fortran project?
Aug
1
awarded  Yearling
Jul
28
comment Intel compiler segmentation violation when compiling using -openmp and -ipo with Cray LibSci on Cray XC30
It's the Intel compiler, and the -ipo phase in particular that is having issues. It tries reading the libraries (to see if there is any Intel intermediate code) and is running into a problem. Is this reproducible with a current Intel compiler version (15.0.4 is current)? If so, please report to Intel, or Cray if they provide your support (Cray will then work with us.)
Jul
22
comment How to use Intel fortran compiler with MKL on command line
No, what happened is that MKL changed the names of the modules in a newer MKL version. See the MKL release notes for details.
Jul
20
answered How to use Intel fortran compiler with MKL on command line
Jul
15
comment Using allocatable/assumed-size arrays with namelist read write
I am told that this bug has been fixed. The fix should appear in Update 1 to the 16.0 compiler, probably in the October-November timeframe.
Jun
23
answered Include File in Fortran in VisualStudio 2013
Jun
18
comment Using allocatable/assumed-size arrays with namelist read write
Ian is correct, this is a compiler bug. But it's NOT the case discussed in the forum topic you linked, which was a local, allocatable array. I will send this on to the developers.
Jun
17
comment Translating FORTRAN DLLIMPORT to C++ / C#
There are a few things going on here. The first is that the DLL routine, as others have said, uses the STDCALL calling mechanism, There is a C# way to specify that, but I am not sure what it is. Another is the string lengths. Here you'll have to know which compiler built the DLL, as the lengths may immediately follow the string addresses, or they may be at the end. My guess is that they will follow the addresses, as that was the DEC/Compaq (and MS) convention, and if the DLL was built using Intel Visual Fortran, the lengths would probably be at the end.
Jun
16
answered How exactly do pointers in Fortran differ from C/C++ pointers?
Jun
16
comment How to call Fortran routine with unit number argument from C
There is no connection whatsoever and don't even think of trying to create one. C and Fortran don't share I/O systems and Fortran unit numbers do not correspond to C file descriptors. The Fortran I/O system may (or may not) use C I/O underneath, but that's not helpful to you. You should do all your I/O from one language - have callbacks into that language if needed.
Jun
11
answered VS2013 integration with Intel Fortran Compiler
Jun
10
comment fortran include header files
.fd is a file type used for Fortran include files by Microsoft PowerStation Fortran and its follow-on compilers, Digital/Compaq Visual Fortran and Intel Visual Fortran. As Mark says, the file type has no particular meaning in an INCLUDE line, but if you add such a source to a Visual Fortran project it's good to NOT use .f90, .for or .f as otherwise the build system will try to compile it separately. .fd is as good a file type as any others for this purpose.
May
16
answered What happens to Fortran scratch files when a program terminates early?
May
16
answered Proper use of the PURE keyword Fortran
May
16
comment Proper use of the PURE keyword Fortran
If by "change its value" you mean the value of the target of the pointer, then gfortran has a bug. INTENT for pointer dummy arguments is for the association status of the pointer, not what it is pointing to. See F2008, section 5.3.10, paragraph 2.