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Mar
6
comment Global Git ignore
I totally agree with @StanKurdziel. I can't think of a good reason to use a global .gitignore file. Maybe if you have a project with people using a huge variety of editors and IDE's you might not want to clutter the project's .gitignore with all kinds of things tailored to each IDE... but frankly I'd live with the clutter.
Mar
3
comment How to retrieve colorbar instance from figure in matplotlib
In my case ax.images is an empty list, even though there's a color bar there.
Mar
3
comment How to retrieve colorbar instance from figure in matplotlib
Yes, how does one retrieve a color bar after it's been made? Supposing I have the axes onto which the color bar was drawn, how does one get that color bar?
Feb
24
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
30
accepted Why does a method with type parameter bound >: allow subtypes?
Dec
30
comment Why does a method with type parameter bound >: allow subtypes?
"But if you go through the consequences, it really preserves the type soundness." Yes, definitely. I came across this because, worried that >: would prevent the ability to pass subtypes, I was trying to figure out how to recover that ability. I'm glad it works the way it does. I was just, as you say, perplexed. Your answer emphasizing the difference between the type parameter and the covariance of the input position clears it all up. Thanks.
Dec
30
asked Why does a method with type parameter bound >: allow subtypes?
Dec
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
revised Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
clean up code
Nov
29
comment Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
@Deniz You can't @ me beacuse you're commenting on my post. A user automatically gets notifications on comments on their own post. Also, I wanted to draw your attention to the fact that I provided you a complete working code sample and it helped you. Please do this in your questions as well. Questions are much easier to understand with an example; describing code is almost useless. Also, writing a minimal example makes you solve your own problem 99% of the time.
Nov
29
comment Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
@Deniz please also note the existence of the signal processing stack exchange.
Nov
29
comment Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
@Deniz I'm glad I could help. I have found the literature on signal processing to be unsatisfactory, so I wrote my own set of notes on these topics. I am happy to give you a copy if you like. You can contact me if you look at my physics stack exchange user profile and follow the link to my professional website.
Nov
29
accepted Rebase a branch after submitting part of it for review
Nov
29
revised Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
add code example
Nov
29
comment Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
You're not sorting the frequencies correctly :D Also, in general, when you post code on any online forum, please include a self contained working example (SCWE). This is considered standard practice. Not doing this will very, very often make someone who would otherwise give you an answer just ignore the post instead.
Nov
29
comment Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
@Deniz It's really hard to understand a written description of code. Can you just edit the original post to show what you've tried?
Nov
28
revised Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
brackets
Nov
28
answered Manually inverting FFT using Numpy
Nov
24
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
20
awarded  Caucus