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Mathematician, Python core language developer, professional Python trainer and professional Python developer (principally in the scientific and financial domains). Particular interests in binary and decimal floating-point and numerics, formal verification of software and mathematics, algorithms, computational cohomology, and much more. Programming experience in a wide variety of languages, from Fortran through Haskell.


Jan
11
comment Why doesn't Python have a floating point comparison operator
And the regular comparison operators (==, <=, ...) already do floating-point comparisons, and work perfectly, returning exact results. Perhaps you could elaborate on precisely what problem you intend to solve with the proposed operators? In any case, this seems like an off-topic question for SO.
Jan
11
comment Why doesn't Python have a floating point comparison operator
Note: Python does not specify anything about using IEEE 754 for floating-point. The CPython reference implementation is written to use whatever the C double type is, whether that's IEEE 754 or not.
Jan
9
revised Small random values in range [0,1], non-uniform, on log scale for GA? in Python
Removed unrelated "logging" tag.
Jan
9
comment Calcualte range for any n-Bit long extended floating point
You are aware that this doesn't match the common 80-bit extended precision x87 format (which has 1 sign bit, 15 exponent bits, and 64 significand bits, and unlike the other IEEE 754 formats does not have a hidden 1-bit)?
Jan
5
revised Does infinite of floating point number satisfy these equation?
Fix tags: this question is about the infinity floating-point value, not about infinite loops / processes.
Jan
1
comment Trying to find the prime numbers using Python
Why would you use the for .. else construct here? Without any break statements inside the for loop, the else is redundant - just place the return True at the same indentation level as the initial for loop.
Dec
24
comment Working with random integers
Could you provide some context? What is a "cap"? What is a "trial"? What does it mean for a trial to "open" a cap?
Dec
16
comment dictionary lookup on Python 2.7 vs 3.4
Note that the types are significantly different: for Python 2 you've got a dictionary mapping bytestrings to fixed-width ints, while for Python 3 you're mapping Unicode strings to arbitrary-precision ints. It could be that hashing a Unicode string is slower than hashing a bytestring, or that comparisons between long integers are slower than comparisons between fixed-width integers. I couldn't say for sure that that's where the timing difference comes from, though.
Dec
12
comment How to define underflow for an implementation(IEEE754) which support subnormal numbers?
You'll probably want to get a copy of IEEE 754 (if you haven't already) and follow that. The underflow rules are described in section 7.5. You need to decide whether you want to detect underflow "after rounding" or "before rounding". The cutoff for underflow detection is very slightly different in the two cases. "before rounding" is simplest to describe (but not necessarily to implement): if the true result is nonzero and strictly smaller than MinNorm, the underflow exception should be signaled. (But the flag isn't necessarily set; again, see the standard for the details.)
Dec
12
comment How to define underflow for an implementation(IEEE754) which support subnormal numbers?
And in reference 1, "an operation that's smaller than... " doesn't make much sense. What's the size of an operation? </nit>.
Dec
12
comment How to define underflow for an implementation(IEEE754) which support subnormal numbers?
w.r.t. IEEE 754, the wikipedia reference is more correct. Roughly speaking, a result smaller than the smallest normal number gives underflow. The details are rather subtle, though: the cutoff isn't necessarily exactly MinNorm. Google for "underflow before rounding" and "underflow after rounding" for more information. There are also subtleties with respect to the underflow flag versus the underflow signal.
Dec
11
comment Converting 2 point to a line in ax+by+c=0
Thanks. I tweaked the equations so that they're even more correct! +1.
Dec
11
revised Converting 2 point to a line in ax+by+c=0
Tweak values so that they work.
Dec
11
comment Converting 2 point to a line in ax+by+c=0
Could you please edit your answer to include the fixes I mentioned? As it stands, the answer is incorrect. (Try it with some sample values of x1, y1, etc.)
Dec
10
revised Converting 2 point to a line in ax+by+c=0
Fix inconsistent capitalization.
Dec
10
comment Converting 2 point to a line in ax+by+c=0
The slope is -A/B, so you need to negate either A or B here. A = y1 - y2, B = x2 - x1, C = x1 * y2 - y1 * x2 works, for example.
Dec
3
comment Syntax error with 'if or' in python. Not sure what's wrong with the code
Try counting the parentheses in the second line.
Nov
24
comment inf not convertible to a float
"the integers just wrap around" is a bit misleading: there's no integer wraparound (in the sense of automatic reduction modulo some power of 2) in plain Python. (NumPy is a different matter, of course.)
Nov
24
comment Numpy float64 vs Python float
Note also that the Pandas read_csv function employs its own super-fast string-to-float conversion that is not correctly rounded. Thus after exporting a value and re-reading it, the recovered value may end up being 1 or 2 ulps different from the original.
Nov
21
answered Error casting to float, then int in python