707 reputation
719
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
3
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
14
accepted Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
Mar
13
comment Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
Ok, this is really what I wanted to know. Cannot find very formal documentation for this, do you have a link to MSDN docs on this subject? Sorry about the edit, I realized that my real question was making sure that they wouldn't be orphaned upon deletion, original question was bad.
Mar
13
revised Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
edited title
Mar
13
comment Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
I guess the main thing is that they are unlinked when the parent is deleted right?
Mar
13
comment Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
Maybe I moved it onto a non NTFS drive on accident
Mar
13
comment Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
They don't though, at least not across drives.
Mar
13
asked Does NTFS alternate data stream become orphaned upon parent deletion?
Mar
8
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
22
comment What's the difference between the two C++ allocation methods
In the case of 10,000,000 objects - on 32-bit OS this would take 40,000,000Bytes of (4-byte) pointers which is 39,062.5 KB; In addition to whatever slight cost of dynamically allocating a section. I just want to make it clear that the cost of doing this should not be exaggerated, because adding more objects will have very predictable and generally negligible recourse.
Feb
22
comment What's the difference between the two C++ allocation methods
I up-voted this because of the good benchmarks but my point remains, the additional memory consumption assuming there is some sort of memory management attempt at all is just that which is required to store the pointers to your objects. Excess memory measured is just a result of the section allocation, or storage of pointers. (malloc cannot alloc less than 4096 bytes after all)
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
Horrible solution for a horribly written question. He could just link the clib statically, lol.
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
@LuizEduardoF. If you wanted an alternate solution you could just use a char* buffer and call gets instead.. If you're just asking why using cin >> phone doesn't work it's because that's just the way it's designed. It splits input up between spaces
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
I still can't remotely comprehend what he's asking with "when the loop finishes the logic and returns to the begining, it doesn't ask for the phone again. It just goes through the logic again, any ideas?" assuming that his solution with getline worked fine
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
Are there two questions here? One about how to include spaces in the getline and another about why its not asking for the phone number again?
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
I guess that would work nevermind, I'm just getting confused by the question in general. Of course its not asking for the phone again if loop2 never evaluates to false
Feb
19
comment Unexpected behavior of getline function
Isn't getline called std::cin.getline(std::string,size)
Feb
19
comment What's the difference between the two C++ allocation methods
@awesomeyi I think he knows that, I believe the code is merely an example to make the question clear
Feb
19
comment What's the difference between the two C++ allocation methods
This is a good answer but I don't think it really answers the idea of the memory being fragmented if these objects use some other kind of memory allocation after the base structure is created, it's hard to say without knowing what the object is.