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visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen Oct 23 at 23:07

Jul
16
comment Monoid vs MonadPlus
Re the overlap with Data.Monoid: this is exactly what I was confused by. Why isn't it automatically the case that forall a. MonadPlus m => Monoid (m a)? If we weren't worried about backwards compatibility, and could assume -XFlexibleInstances, then is there any further reason for that not to automatically hold?
Mar
16
comment Gcc pure/const functions and longjmp
Good, I'm glad you articulated this. It's something I also worried about.
Mar
16
comment Gcc pure/const functions and longjmp
Thanks, I think you're probably right. The only thing I wanted to question concerned "Pure functions cannot reasonably lack a return type." Sure, that's true, but why do you say it? In the cases I'm imagining, the functions will have a clear return type, determined by what they return when they do return.
Mar
16
comment Gcc pure/const functions and longjmp
The most relevant other question I've found is this.
Mar
7
comment Is calling memmove or memcpy with NULL defined?
Thanks all. This is also what the standard seemed to me to say. I just wanted to see if there was something I was missing that others knew about.
Mar
7
comment Is calling memmove or memcpy with NULL defined?
Thanks @Urit, I didn't find that.
Feb
4
comment Git as mercurial client? Why no git-hg?
I think it was this
Jun
14
comment Git interoperability with a Mercurial Repository
There's also Kiln Harmony.
Jan
12
comment Commenting in BASH script
However, as others have mentioned, cat file1 | # comment<newline>sort works fine. So too does cat file1 && # comment<newline>echo foo. So comments can be included after | or && or ||, but not after `\` or in the middle of a command.
Nov
14
comment Commenting in BASH script
"You should be able to put comment lines in between your commands": no, this is only working because the last interpreted character of the previous lines is |. If you try cat file1\<newline>#comment<newline>file2, you'll see you don't get cat file1 file2, but rather cat file1; file2.
Nov
6
comment Letrec and reentrant continuations
Note also that it's arguable that the fragment in question violates the requirement that the continuation of an init clause is only invoked once. Isn't the continuation invoked once, in place, when the (begin ...) clause evaluates to 0, and a second time when evaluating (c 0)? I suspect that the "only-invoked-once" requirement wasn't meant to prohibit this, but only meant to prohibit applying the captured continuation more than once. But as I said, this is debatable.
Nov
4
comment Letrec and reentrant continuations
Here's a link to what I think is the original discussion of this fragment: groups.google.com/d/msg/comp.lang.scheme/FB1HgUx5d2s/…
Nov
4
comment What, if any, is wrong with this definition of letrec in Scheme?
@Davorak Well, technically the definition will work in all implementations. It's just that in some implementations the internal defines it uses will be expanded into the native implementation of letrec.
Nov
4
comment What are the differences between 'let' or 'letrec' and 'define' for creating local bindings?
Strictly speaking, length and sum are guaranteed to be bound (to locations); what isn't guaranteed is that they have yet been assigned their initializing values. And even if they have been assigned them, the Scheme reports R5RS--R7RS say it's nonetheless an "error" to be referencing those values in the way you do in the initializing clauses for total and count. (However, I don't think that implementations are required to detect and complain about this error.) Some more on differences btw letrec/letrec*: stackoverflow.com/q/13078165/272427
Nov
4
comment Example where letrec/letrec* is better than let with internal defines or named let ?
This may just be a testament to the well-designed libraries you're using. All your invocations of letrec are really taking place under the guise of map and so on.
Oct
26
comment Bash - for-loop for every folder in a directory, excluding some of them
Instead of flag=0;break; you could just use continue 2. Then delete the later if [[ $flag -eq 0 ]] ... wrapper.
Oct
21
comment Reading with cat: Stop when not recieving data
Nice. Unfortunately it's not on my tails. I expect it's Gnu-only.
Oct
21
comment Is it necessary to specify traps other than EXIT?
So the best answer is a combination of this one and Brandon Horsley's: for portability, don't assume that the trap ... 0 will be executed on SIGTERM, and don't assume that it won't. Make a separate trap "exit 1" SIGTERM ... to guarantee that it will.
Oct
20
comment With bash, how can I pipe standard error into another process?
What is the value of using 1>&2- here rather than just 1>&2? I don't understand why we'd want to close fd 2, if we're just going to reopen/reassign it immediately.
Oct
19
comment Comparing values of different type
@furq that's a nice idea. In fact, he could just store an empty table in the external module, and retrieve it by require mymodule, then create the function in his Lua code, and save it in the table to be retrieved later. Or he could do this to some table he's already sure is stored in package.loaded.