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May
31
comment How do I split a string on a delimiter in Bash?
Consider using read -r ... to ensure that, for example, the two characters "\t" in the input end up as the same two characters in your variables (instead of a single tab char).
May
31
comment How do I split a string on a delimiter in Bash?
Diagnosis: the IFS=";" assignment exists only in the $(...; echo $IN) subshell; this is why some readers (including me) initially think it won't work. I assumed that all of $IN was getting slurped up by ADDR1. But nickjb is correct; it does work. The reason is that echo $IN command parses its arguments using the current value of $IFS, but then echoes them to stdout using a space delimiter, regardless of the setting of $IFS. So the net effect is as though one had called read ADDR1 ADDR2 <<< "bla@some.com john@home.com" (note the input is space-separated not ;-separated).
May
31
comment How do I split a string on a delimiter in Bash?
@BrooksMoses: (a) +1 for using local IFS=... where possible; (b) -1 for unset IFS, this doesn't exactly reset IFS to its default value, though I believe an unset IFS behaves the same as the default value of IFS ($' \t\n'), however it seems bad practice to be assuming blindly that your code will never be invoked with IFS set to a custom value; (c) another idea is to invoke a subshell: (IFS=$custom; ...) when the subshell exits IFS will return to whatever it was originally.
May
31
comment How to count differences between two files on linux?
As sureshw points out in another answer, comm expects its arguments to be sorted files. So this suggestion can only be relied on in special cases. (I think it would be easy to write your own version of comm using awk that worked for not-sorted input, too, but doubt that this satisfies the spirit of the original question anymore.)
May
30
comment Extract filename and extension in Bash
If you're going to do it this way, save yourself some forks and instead use: (IFS=/ ; for x in $path; do filename=$x; done). The (...) subshell is needed to localize the assignment to IFS.
May
30
comment Extract filename and extension in Bash
Instead of dir="${fullpath:0:${#fullpath} - ${#filename}}" I've often seen dir="${fullpath%$filename}". It's simpler to write. Not sure if there is any real speed difference or gotchas.
May
30
comment Why can't variables be declared in a switch statement?
First is not fine on gcc 4.2: "error: expected expression before 'int'". As Peter and Mr.32 say, "case 0: ; int j; ..." and "case 0: ; int j = 7; ..." do both work. The problem in C is just that "case <label>: declaration" is not valid C syntax.
May
27
comment read a part of JSON file
You can use a JSON parsing module in awk as well: see github.com/dubiousjim/awkenough/blob/master/README.lib and search for query_json. Just saying that to counter the widespread misimpression that awk is too lowpowered for this kind of thing. That said, I don't see anything in the question which makes awk more suitable than any of the other tools.
May
6
comment Using Unix Tools to Extract String Values
I point to a robust pure-awk solution at stackoverflow.com/a/10468771/272427
May
6
comment Parsing json with sed and awk
There's nothing essentially line-oriented about awk; and no reason to think it's an inadequate tool for this task. See the solution linked in my comment. (Perhaps you didn't mean to disagree.)
May
5
comment Delete lines from file with SED or AWK
@anubhava, sorry, mental glitch. I thought you were trying to do something else; don't know on what basis I thought so.
May
5
comment Delete lines from file with SED or AWK
@Beta, first two are exactly right, but the third will print the first line only.
Apr
26
comment Accessing shell variable in awk but not interpreted
Sorry, what I said is true of FS not RS. Don't know what my brain was doing then.
Apr
24
comment scanf,back reference in awk
gsub doesn't provide backreferences. To get them directly, you need to use the gawk extension gensub (also available in some other awks, like BusyBox), or gawk's optional 3rd argument to match. You can use gsub to implement the same thing manually, which will be more portable; but, it's not a simple one-liner.
Apr
24
comment awk: access captured group from line pattern
@MestreLion, you mean it will complain for gawk --posix '{gensub(...)}'.
Apr
23
comment /usr/bin/env questions regarding shebang line pecularities
Not claiming the first. The OP's question is about the second, though: he/she asked "What does the kernel do if you stick a shell-script into the shebang line?" and then reports problems that come from using env.1 as a shebang line, where env.1 is a script. (As it happens, it was searching for discussions of limitations about shebang lines that brought me here. And I did find your post had useful information, so thanks for contributing it. I was just pointing out, for other readers who may come later, that what you discuss doesn't help overcome the limitation the OP had come up against.)
Apr
23
comment /usr/bin/env questions regarding shebang line pecularities
This is useful information, but as the OP says, his/her kernel won't run non-binaries (such as the bash stubs you provide) as the first element of a shebang line. Mine won't either; specifically, the kernel silently fails to run the script with the problematic shebang line in the desired (non-binary) interpreter, and then my shell will try to run the script instead. (My understading is that this is an old-time shell behavior which many shells retain.)
Apr
20
comment sed/awk or other: one-liner to increment a number by 1 keeping spacing characters
Nice: the idea here is we stop treating spans of whitespace as delimiters, but instead honor each whitespace character as a delimiter. Note though that this will replace any tab in the input line with OFS (a space). That may be undesired.
Apr
19
comment Running python 64 with shebang (#!) on Mac
On many systems, this will pass a single argument with the value arch -x86_64 /usr/bin/python2.6 to env, which won't split that value up. To my knowledge there is no elegant and fully-portable workaround. For non-portable workarounds, FreeBSD's env has the -S switch. For ugly workarounds, you do things like this: #!/bin/sh<br>'''exec' /usr/bin/arch -x86_64 /usr/bin/python2.6 # '''<br># vi: syntax=python
Apr
19
comment Git: how to deal with different shebang
@Mikel, but on many systems you can't pass more than a single argument on the shebang line, the whole rest of the line will be passed to env as $1.