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  • 29 votes cast
Oct
3
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
24
accepted Companion sample Xcode project for “Apple Help Programming Guide”?
Aug
10
revised What tool or technology does Apple use to create its documentation?
Fixed link to point to the new site for AppleDoc.
Aug
9
answered Do I need to release a constant NSString?
Aug
9
comment Cocoa: Getting the return value of a method from a separate class
If that line is all you added, it's just going to be sending init to nil. You may want to (re-)read Xcode's documentation on “Allocating and Initializing Objects.” I don't mean to give offense if you're not, but it does seem like you are a beginning (Objective-C) programmer. I strongly recommend you learn Smalltalk first. It's easier to learn, and because Objective-C is heavily based on it, you can later ease into taking on the extra complexities of Objective-C. A good starting point is Pharo's “Get started now” download: pharo-project.org
Aug
8
revised Cocoa: Getting the return value of a method from a separate class
added 182 characters in body
Aug
8
answered Cocoa: Getting the return value of a method from a separate class
Apr
12
comment NSFilemanager doesn't create file
Oops, you're right! I missed that one.
Apr
11
answered NSFilemanager doesn't create file
Apr
10
awarded  Critic
Apr
3
comment Object Oriented question
Ah, I see now. :) I would suggest to add an explanative disclaimer when you post an incomplete or possibly incorrect answer on purpose. I recently did something similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/5494133/…. In your case, something like "I don't want to give you a full answer because it's a course assignment, but here's a hint so that you can hopefully figure it out on your own and learn something." It helps prevent "what was this guy thinking posting that as an answer?!"-downvotes ;)
Apr
3
comment Object Oriented question
I'm not the down-voter, but I can see why your answer was down-voted as it doesn't really make clear how the original poster should address the teacher's criticism.
Apr
3
comment NSString writeToFile with URL encoded string
I'm afraid that unless you can post enough of your code or other instructions here for someone else to reproduce the problem on their own machine, this is turning too much into a remote debugging session, which isn't the purpose of this site. I can only offer you generic advice at this point: use the Xcode debugging tools, or add some NSLog to your code. As you say the code works without the encode URL line, I'd put a breakpoint or NSLog(@"Encoded: %@", searchString) right after that and maybe NSLog(@"Logging: %@", theString) at the start of logText:.
Apr
3
revised Is asserting that every object creation succeeded necessary in Objective C?
added 138 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Apr
3
answered Sending a message to nil?
Apr
3
revised Is asserting that every object creation succeeded necessary in Objective C?
edited body
Apr
3
revised Is asserting that every object creation succeeded necessary in Objective C?
added 153 characters in body
Apr
3
comment Is asserting that every object creation succeeded necessary in Objective C?
@Palimondo: preventing you from having to be paranoid about every object creation is (I guess) why Objective-C is designed so that you can safely send messages to nil in most cases. I've edited my answer to explain this further. I'm assuming that this design predates the inclusion of optional exception handling support in the language. In C on the other hand, you'd have to be paranoid about malloc returning NULL, at least if you want your application to end gracefully rather than crash, since C doesn't have a similar design where doing something with NULL is usually safe.
Apr
3
revised Is asserting that every object creation succeeded necessary in Objective C?
added 604 characters in body; added 143 characters in body
Apr
3
comment NSString writeToFile with URL encoded string
Side comment: it's odd that you are reading and writing the entire contents of the file just to append a string at the end. As for your problem, I still haven't detected a reason for why your code works without the stringByAddingPercentEscapesUsingEncoding: transformation but doesn't if you add it. Are you able to reproduce the problem as a small SenTestingKit unit test that you could post here (and which doesn't rely on any of your own code, so others can try it; perhaps use a separate new Xcode project)?