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I'm an experienced C++ programmer. B.Sc. student in pure mathematics department in Tel-Aviv university.

Some of my programming projects are:

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3h
comment std::ostream that invokes a callback for each line
@JamesKanze: untrue. the standard iostreams (cout in particular) when synchronized with stdio (the default) are said to work as if writing each character with fputc to the corresponding C FILE* stream. stdout is by default line-buffered per C standard. In practice I actually experience line-buffering on my system (clang with libc++, FreeBSD 10.0).
21h
comment std::ostream that invokes a callback for each line
Is it so hard to do a memchr? No, there isn't anything like this in std, and not that I know of anything in boost.
Jul
21
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
15
comment fseek/ftell and stat.st_size doesn't return actual file size in text mode
@johnny: "the number of elements successfully read"
Jul
15
comment fseek/ftell and stat.st_size doesn't return actual file size in text mode
@johnny: the actual file size is what ftell and stat returns. What fread returns for the r mode on Windows is a result of a perverted understanding of what files are. You should simply use the rb mode and that's it.
Jul
15
comment fseek/ftell and stat.st_size doesn't return actual file size in text mode
@johnny: you can consider memory mapping the file.
Jul
14
comment fseek/ftell and stat.st_size doesn't return actual file size in text mode
@johnny: If your file is pure text, then you cannot get 200MB from 500MB, at most 250MB. The "margin error" is 50%, which is the case when your file consists entirely of empty lines. Yes, 2.7% waste of memory is not a problem. There are lots of places where your system "wastes" significant amounts of memory for the sake of performance or simplicity: alignment of allocations, preallocations of dynamically growing arrays, etc... Seriously, when even my cell-phone has 2GB of memory, wasting 4MB during processing of 150MB file is negligible.
Jul
14
answered fseek/ftell and stat.st_size doesn't return actual file size in text mode
Jul
11
answered Apply failed hunk with TortoiseSVN
Jul
9
answered How to use std::enable_if with variadic template
Jul
2
comment SQLite - getting closest value
It obviously will work, but is it actually optimized to work in log N time?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
2
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
28
comment How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
@user1003620: they could, but it is unnecessary. Following my edit: before step 4 you don't need the normalized coordinates, and after step 4 you don't need the clip-space coordinates. This is because all the math after step 4 depends only on (xi, yi, zi) which were already computed.
Jun
28
revised How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
edited body
Jun
28
revised How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
added 1386 characters in body
Jun
28
comment How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
@user1003620: I don't understand what's the problem. You can store the vector before and after the division in different registers at the same time... Besides, the normalized device coordinates of what? The vertices? You first compute the position of the vertices on the screen, then rasterize the triangle using any known 2d algorithm which gives you a set of fragments. Each fragment is DEFINED by the X,Y of its device coordinates, this is its fixed position on the screen and denoted by the (u,v) above. Then for each fragment you use its known (u,v) as a parameter in the above formulas.
Jun
28
comment How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
@user1003620: all correct
Jun
27
answered How EXACTLY does OpenGL do perspectively correct linear interpolation?
Jun
27
comment OpenGL vs. OpenCL, which to choose and why?
"...rendering to a floating-point framebuffer ... give you an R11_G11_B10 framebuffer, because ... your algorithm can stand the lower precision." To my understanding, except for the default framebuffer (whose storage format you cannot specify within the GL) this is entirely false. OpenGL spec defines how the data is packed/unpacked to the storage format you specify and what is the precision of the arithmetic, and I cannot find any place where it permits the contrary.