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Jun
21
comment Iterating through STL containers and removing/adding multiple items
@JamesKanze: Well, you could skip those elements that are marked while iterating. I'm not sure, however, that in his use case it actually is a good idea to do that - it creates an asymmetry where, for example, processing element 2 causes the removal of elements 1 and 3, only #3 can be skipped as #1 was already processed.
Jun
21
revised Iterating through STL containers and removing/adding multiple items
added 117 characters in body
Jun
21
answered Iterating through STL containers and removing/adding multiple items
Jun
19
comment How can I make is_pod<T> tests be performed during compilation and not execution?
At least with GCC on any optimization level other than -O0, the loop is completely gone from the resulting ASM, without any explicit checking. Plus, the compiler can and does optimize out the destructor calls even if the type is not strictly a POD if it can otherwise prove they aren't needed.
Jun
19
comment How can I make is_pod<T> tests be performed during compilation and not execution?
I'm really surprised if the compiler doesn't know to automatically eliminate the whole loop as a no-op when T is a pod. Are you sure you had optimization enabled when testing?
Jun
18
revised Why do I need to specify the template argument type of a templated function here?
added 35 characters in body
Jun
18
answered Why do I need to specify the template argument type of a templated function here?
Jun
18
comment Why do I need to specify the template argument type of a templated function here?
@RalphTandetzky: Yes, f1(t) is a valid expression due to function template argument deduction. The compiler can infer, based on the type of the parameter t, which instantiation of the function template f1 to call - it replaces the f1(t) with f1<T>(t). This is basically just some syntactic sugar. When you want to pass an instantiation of the f1 template around, the compiler cannot help you, and you have to specify which one you want.
Jun
17
awarded  Pundit
Jun
16
comment 2 threads slower than 1?
@Magtheridon96: Simply making k an std::atomic<int> would prevent the data race, but it would not make the ping pong issue go away because the expression k = k + 1 would still not be atomic. However, k++ or k += 1 would. But the synchronization between processors enforced by the atomic operations, even if lock-free, would still cause overhead - this is simply not a use case that can be sped up using threads. Think of it as trying to write a story with your friend - it would not be faster than doing it alone because you'd have to take turns.
Jun
16
comment 2 threads slower than 1?
@Magtheridon96: In addition to what Mats said, your program has a data race and thus formally undefined behaviour. Anything could happen because you access a shared non-atomic variable from two threads without synchronization. The memory model of x86 processors is somewhat lenient but you really really should not rely on that.
May
3
awarded  Guru
Mar
18
answered Why does std::result_of take an (unrelated) function type as a type argument?
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Feb
9
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
9
comment Iterating over a range of ranges
What you need is a stackoverflow.com/questions/3623082/flattening-iterator.
Nov
9
comment remove_pointer + typename is error
What are you trying to do? That syntax is definitely ill-formed in C++11. If T is an in-scope template type parameter, you should remove the typename before it.