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Feb
15
comment usage c++11 std::tuple in big projects
Please do not do this. You pretty much just reinvented structs with a much poorer syntax and no advantages whatsoever.
Dec
24
comment Why does member `float x` get initialized with `0.` for the objects `a` and `b` in main()?
In the real world, the values of uninitialized variables just evaluating to zero in a newly started process is quite probable, as modern operating systems typically zero out memory pages before handing them out to applications for security reasons.
Dec
23
comment Can C++ constexpr function actually accept non-constant expression as argument?
@God_of_Thunder: Only the -pedantic -W -Wall part is relevant to your case. I recommend using those, as well, to catch as many potential errors as possible, but you should always consult your compiler's documentation to see what each switch does before blindly applying them.
Dec
3
comment async with member function
It's arguable that C++ should have a concept of a "bound member function pointer" in the core language, as many people do intuitively expect that the syntax you want to use should work. However, it does not, and adding the feature to the existing type system would not be trivial. On the other hand, it is easy to emulate it on the library level -- it's called std::mem_fn and it is internally used by std::async to make the async(&a::b, c) syntax work.
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
@Johan: Do you understand that if you have two pointers to an object, and set one of them to null, it has no effect whatsoever on the other pointer? If you do int* foo = new int; int* bar = foo; delete foo; foo = 0; *bar = 42;, then the bar pointer will still point to the now-deleted memory, its value has not magically changed to null!
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
@Johan: There will be no more calls that can access that pointer because the object containing the pointer is destructed! Yes, if it's set to null during the object lifetime, it will both cause subsequent non-delete accesses to it to fail noisily (which is a good thing) and hide subsequent double deletions (which is a bad thing), but in this case it cannot be accessed ever again, so setting it to any value is pointless.
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
@Johan: If you try to delete the same object through multiple pointers, you're screwed anyway. Setting just one of the pointers to null isn't going to help. If you have references (or pointers) to the pointer itself, then setting it to null will hide a double delete, but that's just pathological.
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
The point of the question is whether the value should change to null. And the answer to that is, no, it should not, and it should be const.
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
@JasonSwartz: if the pointer isn't shared, and it's only deleted in the destructor, yes, it's very hard to accidentally cause a double delete. On the other hand, if that is the case, it makes no sense to make the code more complicated by resetting the pointer to null -- we're in the destructor and the pointer is never seen after that! (except maybe in a case of heap/stack corruption)
Nov
26
comment C++ NULL pointers and const correctness
I'd disagree that it's a good practice. Double-deleting a pointer is almost always a logic bug in your application, and setting the pointer to null after deletion hides that bug. If you don't set it to null, the app will probably crash, which is a good thing.
Sep
15
comment Generating 64-bit values with a 32-bit Mersenne Twister
@MoreAxes - What CortAmmon said. uniform_real_distribution will draw as many 32-bit values from mt19937 as it needs to generate a single uniformly-distributed double. It's all implemented for you.
Sep
13
comment Accumulating many vectors into a single container w/o copying
@Walter - std::deque maintains carefully selected invariants on the length and number of the internal "chunks" to be performant - not just any old vectors will do.
Sep
13
comment Accumulating many vectors into a single container w/o copying
@Walter - the vector of pointers would store a pointer to each element in each of the vectors, so, given two vectors v and w, it would look like { &v[0], &v[1], ..., &v[n], &w[0], &w[1], ..., &w[m] }
Sep
13
comment Accumulating many vectors into a single container w/o copying
One workaround would be storing the returned vectors and keeping another vector of pointers to the elements.
Sep
13
comment the weird result_of<F(Ts…)> in Andrei Alexandrescu's talk about exploding tuple
See this question for more info about result_of and its admittedly funky syntax.
Sep
2
comment Why is the behavior of uninitialized containers different with optimizations?
@DyP Thanks, added a clarification.
Aug
31
comment std::thread::detach causes crash after original caller is destroyed
@VittorioRomeo - otherwise you'd need a mutex to protect it. According to the standard, non-atomic types are never safe to access concurrently without explicit synchronization if at least one of those accesses is a write.
Aug
29
comment Is reinterpret_cast to C-style array illegal C++11?
@R.MartinhoFernandes Damn, you got me there :P Also, there are array literals in C99... Oh well. Perhaps the correct thing to say is that there cannot be temporary array objects at runtime. String literals (and presumably the C99 array literals) are still lvalues, not rvalues.
Aug
29
comment Is reinterpret_cast to C-style array illegal C++11?
No expression can yield an array in C or C++ -- arrays cannot be rvalues. They always have a name and an address.
Aug
10
comment How to avoid the copy when I return
@cmaster: Optimizing out a copy in case of returning a named variable is usually called NRVO, named return value optimization, and has been implemented years ago by most compilers.