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comment Weighted random selection from array
@Mike: That would work. You can also simply select further objects from the list, and retry if you happen to hit one that you've already got. This approach is better if the total weights of objects that are selected during this process is likely to be small, because you rarely need to retry in that case.
13h
comment Iterate an iterator by chunks (of n) in Python?
@JonathanEunice: In almost all cases, this is what people want (which is the reason why it is included in the Python documentation). Optimising for a particular special case is out of scope for this question, and even with the information you included in your comment, I can't tell what the best approach would be for you. If you want to chunk a list of numbers that fits into memory, you are probably best off using NumPy's .resize() message. If you want to chunk a general iterator, the second approach is already quite good -- it creates temporary tuples of size 200K, but that's not a big deal.
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comment NaNs as key in dictionaries
@max: Each call to float('nan') produces a new float instance, just as each call to float(1) creates a new float instance. This isn't by itself a bad thing. np.nan is a global name in the NumPy module, and will point to the same object as long as you don't reassign it, so under normal circumstances np.nan is a single value. (I wouldn't call it a singleton, since this name is ised for a class that only allows a single instance, like NoneType.)
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revised Alternative to execfile in Python 3.2+?
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comment Weighted random selection from array
@Mazzy: Binary search can be easily used to find the interval the value you are looking for lies in, and that's all you need. Most binary search implementations in standard libraries of programming languages don't require the exact value to be found, e.g. lower_bound() in C++ or bisect_left() in Python.
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comment Weighted random selection from array
@Mazzy: You are looking for the interval containing the random number you generated -- in this case the interval form 0.3 to 0.7. Of course you can't expect the exact value to appear, but a binary search for finding the interval will work anyway.
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