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 Enlightened
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20h
answered Git ignore file, without deleting it
22h
comment How to avoid complete merge history into master in GIT?
Assuming you don't have any commits on master that aren't on release, a much easier and faster way of squashing the commits would be git checkout release -- .; git commit while on master. I'm not saying that squashing the commits is a good idea (I don't see what it would be useful for). It's only if you decide to squash them for some reason, you can just as well do it the easy way.
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awarded  Enlightened
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
comment Python Return Syntax Error
As a side note, return x[1] += 3; is valid C code, but it's equivalent to x[1] += 3; return x[1];.
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answered Python Return Syntax Error
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comment Python: memory leak when resizing images
I think the resize() method returns None anyway, so it's rather immaterial what you do with that return value. Images are backed by buffers that may be shared among multiple Python objects. It's a bit tricky to track down whether they get freed. You might want to take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/1435415/python-memory-leaks
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comment Git can not find files in branch but will not commit because a file is too large
I suggest searching the output of git log --name-status for the file names. If the file existed previously and was deleted, you will be able to see the commit that removed the file (as well as the one that added it).
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answered Is there a simple pad in numpy?
Sep
1
comment if file name(just name) comparision shell script
@user2164400: No, it's shell syntax for "remove the longest pattern matching *.log from the variable f". -z checks whether what remains is the empty string. Note that there is never a reason to use this unreadable mess in practice, since the constraint of insisting to use an if-statement when far better alternatives exist isn't a practical one. Since you didn't tell us what you want to achieve, we won't be able to teach you better options.
Sep
1
comment if file name(just name) comparision shell script
Just for the record, one way of doing this with an if-statement is if [ -z "${f%%*.log}" ]; then ...; fi.
Sep
1
comment if file name(just name) comparision shell script
@user2164400: Yes, there are ways to do this using an if-statement, but if what you want is to loop over all *.log files, that would be utterly pointless. If you actually want to do something else, I suggest accepting this answer and asking a new question explaining what you want to achieve and what you have tried – you'll get far more useful answers that way.
Sep
1
comment if file name(just name) comparision shell script
Leaving aside that the string comparison operator in POSIX shell is =, not ==, the condition of your if statement looks for filenames that are identical to the name with an additional .log appended. This will obviously never be the case, since every filename will be different after you appended .log.
Sep
1
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
31
comment How did Python implement the built-in function pow()?
@BenSandler: Because aa' (mod c) and bb' (mod c) imply aba'b' (mod c), or in other words, it doesn't matter whether you first reduce a and b modulo c and then multiply them, or multiply them first and then reduce modulo c. See the Wikipedia article on modular arithmetic.
Aug
30
comment applying for loop such that counters are multiplied rather than being added in python
Oh, and note that your loop is different from the OP's loop. The OP's loop stops at 16, yours at 2**19.
Aug
30
comment applying for loop such that counters are multiplied rather than being added in python
I really dislike the for x in (generator expression): idiom. It unnecessarily contains two for-loops in the same line and can always be written as for i in range(20): a = 2 ** i, which I find much simpler and clearer.
Aug
30
answered applying for loop such that counters are multiplied rather than being added in python
Aug
30
comment Strange behaviour with `np.floor()` and float division
@NayukiMinase: It's due to the different __repr__() implementations on Python's built-in float type and numpy.float64. I expanded my answer.
Aug
30
revised Strange behaviour with `np.floor()` and float division
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