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visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen Dec 19 '12 at 18:49

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
1
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
5
awarded  Yearling
Dec
24
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
19
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
18
asked Geb: List of Page contents
Dec
12
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
28
accepted PostgreSQL: Combine Select and Insert with returning ID
Aug
28
revised PostgreSQL: Combine Select and Insert with returning ID
grammar
Aug
28
asked PostgreSQL: Combine Select and Insert with returning ID
Jun
13
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
@ypercube orderid is indexed. processed isn't. Going to the solution of absence equaling a pending order surely it shouldn't matter if processed in indexed?
Jun
4
accepted Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
Jun
1
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
1
revised Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
Added performance to the title as that is what the question is about.
Jun
1
revised Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
Added 'performance' tag.
Jun
1
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
@ypercube I see what you mean now. This would essentially change the logic of every query that's dependent on processed as it (the logic) would go from checking the value of the processed column to checking if the row exists ie, absence equals an order that has not been processed.
Jun
1
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
@ypercube Aha. I see. That makes sense. I can make changes to the db design but I would have to justify the change to the db admin first; so as long as we don't have a chain of several of these in a row that might cause a page to time-out I'm going to leave things as they are. Cheers!
Jun
1
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
@ypercube It's c1.id . @TokenMacGuy So lemme make sure I get this right, doing c1.type = 'b' and c2.type = 's' would produce the same result as c1.type = 's' and c2.type = 'b'?
Jun
1
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
Right....makes sense...the trouble is I've simplified the tables and their respective structures to post this question..I'll try and get the explain analyse
Jun
1
comment Performance difference: condition placed at INNER JOIN vs WHERE clause
@a_horse_with_no_name this will be a bit tricky as I have simplified the table structure to post the question....lemme see what I can do.